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Swollen, Red Bump on Top of Dog's Paw


I noticed a small, dime-sized bump on the top of my 9 year old Belgium Sheepdog's paw earlier this week. It seemed to have come out of nowhere, and all the hair covering the area was gone.

Upon further inspection, I noticed that it was red and shiny. I have been cleaning the area with Hydrogen Peroxide 3x a day and then applying calendula cream before wrapping the area with gauze.

He makes every effort to unwrap the gauze, though.
I noted that while he had managed to pull the gauze off, the spot was less irritated. Keeping it on has been a challenge so at this point it is a still quite red.

The spot is very sensitive and feels firm to the touch. He definitely does not like it when it is time to clean it. His activity level has been the same, and he seems like the same happy dog besides the bump. He has been eating and drinking normally as well.

He has a very thick coat, and had a similar spot earlier this year where a foxtail had gotten embedded in the skin. I'm not sure if this is the same type of injury. I feel like I would be able to see a foxtail at the top of his paw though.

Comments for Swollen, Red Bump on Top of Dog's Paw

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Nov 12, 2010
My Online Vet Response for Swollen, Red Bump on top of Dog's Paw
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman


Unfortunately, your photo was not very clear on exactly where this red bump is located on top of your dog's paw. I can give you a list of differentials on what it could be, though.

At this time of year (mid-November) it is unlikely to be a foxtail. It most likely could be a localized infection called 'interdigital pyoderma', and may appear on other feet, usually at the intersection of two toes, or even between two toes, or between two pads on the bottom of the foot.

It may be a wound that has festered, or it may be possibly a 'hot spot', that your dog created by constantly licking the area.

Prevent your dog from licking it by placing an Comfy Cone Pet E-Collar around his neck instead of a bandage on the foot. This will help to decrease the irritation and swelling.

It would be best to have a local veterinarian look at it. A holistic veterinarian would be even better, in order to treat it holistically.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

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DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Related Pages:
- Dog Warts,
- Dog Skin Conditions,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Warts, Cysts and Strange Growths Section

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