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Suspicious Wart on Bichon Frise

by Lisa R.
(Valley Center, CA, USA)


I've noticed that my Bichon Frise has a few warts on him and one in particular, on his back, is asymmetrical -- pink on one side and somewhat grayish on the other (see photo). Also, it smells like pus. I have been checking it over time and it seems to be slightly bigger and changing in color.


I put some Neosporin on it today and it seemed to look better at the end of the day.

Last time I went to the vets, they wanted him to get a ton of shots and I don't want to do anything that isn't absolutely necessary. We live a very holistic lifestyle and I try to take a natural approach to healing. So if there is anything I can do to help him with a homeopathic or home remedy, please advise. If this looks serious, please let me know.

I got him 3 years ago. The rescue wasn't sure about his background, so they guessed that he was 5 at the time. My vet said he was 2 (and that was 2 years ago), so I'm guessing he's anywhere from 4-8 years old. He's very mellow in temperament, sleeps a lot, barks very little, very obedient -- so it makes me think he's on the older side.

I know he got shots when I adopted him, but I don't have the paperwork. I asked the rescue about what shots he may need yearly, and they said they don't recommend vaccines after the age of 5. So he hasn't gotten any shots in three years. He's an indoor-only dog, has never had fleas. Has no contact with other dogs and is always on a leash when he goes outside.

He only drinks filtered water and I buy a quality, protein-rich dog food (Acana Pork & Butternut Squash). I also give him beef bones.

Thank you.

Comments for Suspicious Wart on Bichon Frise

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Feb 04, 2015
My Online Vet Response for: Suspicious Wart on Bichon Frise
by: Dr Carol Jean Tillman

February 4, 2015

Hi Lisa,
From the photo of the wart on your Bichon Frise, it appears to be a benign wart that has become infected. If this is located where he can lick it, and the hair around it was wet, or he rubbed it and caused it to be irritated, it may have caused it to become infected.

Avoiding unnecessary vaccinations for your dog, is to be commended! According to Dr Ron Schultz at the 2013 Western Vet conference, his studies on the Duration of Immunity in Dogs and Cats, shows that vaccinations given between 6 months to 2 years of age will confer immunity for the life of the animal. (including Rabies). At this time, Pharmaceutical companies have not posted such a long duration, so government agencies in charge of Rabies tags/licenses require a booster vaccination every 3 years. Dr Ron Schultz and Dr Jean Dodds are working to get the Rabies vaccine approved for 7-10 years. Check out the article written by Dr Ron Schultz on *Annual Vaccinations* in Current Veterinary Therapy XI.

In the meantime, I suggest you give your Bichon the homeopathic remedy, Thuya (Thuja occidentalis). A 6C or 12C potency would be good to start. Place one pellet into a 1 or 2 oz glass dropper bottle and fill with Spring Water. Succuss (or shake the bottle 20 times by hitting it against the palm of your hand). Give him 1/2 dropperful by mouth TWO times daily for 3-6 weeks.

This remedy is useful to treat warts.

Next, clip the hair away from this wart and use hydrogen peroxide once or twice a day to keep it clean, if needed.

You wrote,
"I buy a quality, protein-rich dog food (Acana Pork & Butternut Squash)."

Is this canned or dry? The canned form would be much healthier for him. As the canned would provide more moisture for his skin, joints, kidneys, bladder, etc. than the dry food.


You wrote,

"I also give him beef bones."
Hopefully, these are RAW. Cooked beef bones may break his teeth. Raw bones are excellent for cleaning his teeth, and keeping his jaw strong.

Regarding vaccinations, perhaps you could seek the help of a holistic veterinarian to write an exemption form for him?

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



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