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Skin of dog turning purple/grey

by A.F.
(Strasbourg, France)





I have an Italian greyhound since 1 month 1/2.

The back of his legs near his testicles started to turn grey/purple with spots about a month ago.

Before, it was "pink". Now the color seems to be equable at this place (see picture march), but I also noticed other new areas with spots on the elbow and forearms.

I didn't see fur loss, except on a little area on the tail. The skin and the fur are soft, and the skin seems to have a good texture when I touch it.

His behavior is normal, he is playful and loving, and his weight is normal. He has eaten barf and raw food since I adopted him (various meats with bones, cereals, vegetables).

He has been treated since 6 February with imidaclopride and moxidecline (sorry, french names) (advocate) for parasites (I don't remember the names of the parasites). He is not scratching too much anymore, and not on those areas.

He also had a cortisone cream because of skin circled damages (on the "January picture", which also shows the skin that was normal-pink).

I added 2 pictures of his entire body (march)

Thank you for the help.

Comments for Skin of dog turning purple/grey

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Mar 07, 2012
My Online Vet Response for: Skin of dog turning purple/grey
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Adelaide,
From the photos of your Italian Greyhound, he appears to be developing the same problem of hair loss (back of thighs and tail) and skin discoloration common in "regular size", "racing" Greyhounds.

It is not uncommon for Greyhounds to have a low thyroid level. In some case this is responsible for the skin condition. In others, their skin and hair coat return to normal when they are off the track and adopted by a loving family.

From your history, it seems that your dog has had some other issues with parasites and skin allergies. Also, in my opinion, I feel that your dog is underweight. I commend you on feeding the BARF diet and raw food, but you may need to increase the grains/carbohydrates, and add some Omega 3 fish oil for dogs to the diet to add calories and to nourish the skin.

Also, since the parasites have been treated (take in another stool sample in a month to make sure he is still Negative), he should put on some more weight. And it would be a good idea to have a blood panel done to include thyroid levels.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area for help. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Related Pages:
- Dog Skin Conditions,
- Dog Itchy Skin,
- Dog Skin Rash,
- Dog Skin Allergies,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Skin Rashes, Marks, Spots, Lesions & Patches (including itchy skin and mange) Section,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Hair Loss Section


Sep 10, 2014
your response
by: Anonymous

Dr Tillman,
How can you determine from a photo that her dog is underweight. Rather then making an accusation as such, why not ask the owner what is the current weight and age of the dog? Strange you would suggest hypothyroidism, which tends to lead to obesity and then criticize the owner for the dog being underweight. Please clarify.

Thanks

Sep 11, 2014
My Online Vet Response for: Skin of dog turning purple/grey
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

September 11, 2014

Dear Anonymous,
You wrote,
"How can you determine from a photo that her dog is underweight."

My answer was prefaced with 'in my opinion' I felt that Adelaide's Italian greyhound was underweight. If I saw her dog in person, my opinion may certainly have been different. But I was only going by a photograph. My disclaimer states: "This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person."


You wrote,
"Rather then making an accusation as such, why not ask the owner what is the current weight and age of the dog?"
That would have been in my next reply, but Adelaide did not respond again. Certainly, a two way conversation with question and answer is MUCH preferable to a one way 'lecture'!


You wrote,
"Strange you would suggest hypothyroidism, which tends to lead to obesity and then criticize the owner for the dog being underweight. Please clarify."
My suggestion of hypothyroidism was due to the rampant problem of low thyroid levels that are seen in 'regular' greyhounds. Dr Jean Dodds, (Hemopet in Irvine, Calif.) and Michigan State University are involved in a huge study of the low thyroid levels seen in greyhounds. These greyhounds also have the exact same skin problems as seen in the photo of Adelaide's Italian Greyhound. Since Italian greyhounds, (whippets) and 'regular' Greyhounds are genetically related, my suggestion that Adelaide have her Italian greyhound's thyroid level tested seemed reasonable.

You are correct that OTHER canine breeds with low thyroid levels are prone to obesity, but that does NOT seem to be the case with greyhounds. Greyhounds do not gain weight with their low thyroid but they DO have a horrible skin problem with hairloss, discoloration, folliculitis, and other lesions.

Thanks for your question, I hope that clarifies things a bit!

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.


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