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Raised scabs, small white pustules, itchy skin on my Rottweiler

I shaved the chest area where the big crusty sore used to be

I shaved the chest area where the big crusty sore used to be

I shaved the chest area where the big crusty sore used to be


Lola is a very sweet and fun loving girl

Around August I noticed a bump on my dog's head. I thought it was just a tick but when I went to pull it off it hurt her and I looked closer and saw that it was a huge raised scab. I thought she just hurt herself playing with my parents dogs at their house so I wasn't too worried but kept an eye on it.


Then my husband and I went on a trip and Lola stayed at my parents house. When we got back, she had 2 crusty oozing sores on her chest each the size of a quarter. I'm not sure if they started as raised scabs or not. They stank like crazy, almost like manure. I went home and scrubbed the crust off. We applied olive oil and a few essential oils highly diluted to soothe the area, and bathed her. The crusty sores got better and went away in a week after I started applying the mixture and the huge raised scab on her head fell off and left smooth white skin underneath.

Now I noticed she has a few more scabs, not as raised as the one on her head. They are on her chest and neck. Where the big crusty sores were are white litte skin tags that are the size of small ticks. The has one bigger bump that is split in three parts, the smaller ones are smooth. I shaved the area to get a better view.

The area seems to be a little itchy but not excessively. It is not sensitive to the touch like the scab on her head was. Her coat is shiny, she is happy and energetic.

She eats Pure Balance kibble and gets 2 tablespoons of coconut oil a day. She also gets high quality leftover meat and vegetables from our meals, maybe once or twice a week.

I am hesitant to take her to our vet because I want to avoid more antibiotics. Every time we take her in they always prescribe antibiotics for everything and it wears down her system. She is so happy and healthy otherwise!

A little backround, Lola is a ten month old Rottweiler. She has had most of the recommended shots. She has a sensitive stomach, had bad dandruff as a little puppy and got ear mites at one point.

We live on a farm where pesticides are sprayed on the fields. Since the fields are right in our backyard, she likes to run and play in them.

Comments for Raised scabs, small white pustules, itchy skin on my Rottweiler

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Nov 06, 2014
My Online Vet Response For: Raised scabs, small white pustules, itchy skin on my Rottweiler
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

November 6, 2014

Hi,
For Lola, your 10 month old, female, (spayed?) Rottweiler, who has had 'most of the recommended shots', you wrote,

"hesitant to take her to our vet because I want to avoid more antibiotics.... they always prescribe antibiotics for everything.... She is so happy and healthy otherwise!"

In my experience, I have found that Rottweilers are very strong, impressive dogs physically, but unfortunately, seem to have inherited poor immune systems!

She is only 10 months old, but in her past medical record you list:
1. Sensitive Stomach
2. Bad Dandruff
3. Ear mites
4. Treatment with lots of antibiotics

Also, ongoing exposure to pesticides. And now, the photos show that she has superficial pyoderma/dermatitis. This problem starts with bacteria in the hair follicles which forms a 'pimple' that pops, the fluid sticks the hair together, and over time mats together with more bacteria accumulating beneath the mat. Hence the 'manure' smell.

Your treatment of clipping the hair, and cleaning the skin is perfect. Although, it is best to keep the area clean and DRY. I would not apply oil. She may need a bath once a week, just to clean her overall, and remove any pesticide residues. Use a mild shampoo, like baby shampoo, which will not dry out her coat.

Although, since she is prone to dandruff, you may wish to give her a coconut oil 'massage' prior to the bath. Let the oil soak in to her skin for several hours, before bathing.

Now, for the INTERNAL treatment:
1. Gradually transition her from a diet that is mostly DRY to a diet that is 1/3 canned, 1/3 RAW and 1/3 dry for EACH meal.
If she weighs:
60 lbs feed her 900 calories per day
70 lbs feed her 1,000 calories per day
80 lbs feed her 1,150 calories per day

See our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options, http://www.organic-pet-digest.com/10-best-dog-food-options.html. Some RAW diets to consider are Primal, Nature's Variety, or BRAVO!

Raw meat contains Vitamin C which will help her immune system.

2. Immune support:
1. Missing Link Canine Formula
2. Immuplex from Standard Process
3. OrthoMolecular Specialties, Mega C Powder

3. No more vaccinations. Or at least not any vaccination until she is completely well. Even then, I would be cautious about giving her a vaccine. And suggest she receive some homeopathic remedies for 'vaccinosis'. A syndrome created in a susceptible individual after a vaccine is given that leads to poor health.
Seek the help of a holistic veterinarian to write an exemption form to avoid any more vaccinations for her. To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



Nov 06, 2014
My Online Vet Response For: Raised scabs, small white pustules, itchy skin on my Rottweiler
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

November 6, 2014

Hi,
For Lola, your 10 month old, female, (spayed?) Rottweiler, who has had 'most of the recommended shots', you wrote,

"hesitant to take her to our vet because I want to avoid more antibiotics.... they always prescribe antibiotics for everything.... She is so happy and healthy otherwise!"

In my experience, I have found that Rottweilers are very strong, impressive dogs physically, but unfortunately, seem to have inherited poor immune systems!

She is only 10 months old, but in her past medical record you list:
1. Sensitive Stomach
2. Bad Dandruff
3. Ear mites
4. Treatment with lots of antibiotics

Also, ongoing exposure to pesticides. And now, the photos show that she has superficial pyoderma/dermatitis. This problem starts with bacteria in the hair follicles which forms a 'pimple' that pops, the fluid sticks the hair together, and over time mats together with more bacteria accumulating beneath the mat. Hence the 'manure' smell.

Your treatment of clipping the hair, and cleaning the skin is perfect. Although, it is best to keep the area clean and DRY. I would not apply oil. She may need a bath once a week, just to clean her overall, and remove any pesticide residues. Use a mild shampoo, like baby shampoo, which will not dry out her coat.

Although, since she is prone to dandruff, you may wish to give her a coconut oil 'massage' prior to the bath. Let the oil soak in to her skin for several hours, before bathing.

Now, for the INTERNAL treatment:
1. Gradually transition her from a diet that is mostly DRY to a diet that is 1/3 canned, 1/3 RAW and 1/3 dry for EACH meal.
If she weighs:
60 lbs feed her 900 calories per day
70 lbs feed her 1,000 calories per day
80 lbs feed her 1,150 calories per day

See our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options, http://www.organic-pet-digest.com/10-best-dog-food-options.html. Some RAW diets to consider are Primal, Nature's Variety, or BRAVO!

Raw meat contains Vitamin C which will help her immune system.

2. Immune support:
1. Missing Link Canine Formula
2. Immuplex from Standard Process
3. OrthoMolecular Specialties, Mega C Powder

3. No more vaccinations. Or at least not any vaccination until she is completely well. Even then, I would be cautious about giving her a vaccine. And suggest she receive some homeopathic remedies for 'vaccinosis'. A syndrome created in a susceptible individual after a vaccine is given that leads to poor health.
Seek the help of a holistic veterinarian to write an exemption form to avoid any more vaccinations for her. To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



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