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How Spaying/Neutering Affects the Dog Glandular System

by Britni
(California )

We have decided against neutering our 3 year old male beagle because of the negative affect it has on the endocrine system (we will not be breeding him). Do you have any thoughts on how the glandular system is affected when dogs are de-sexed?


We do have 2 other beagles that have been de-sexed before we had done research, and I was wondering if this is a good supplement to give.. Pet GO Powder — Glandular Supplement For Dogs and Cats

Comments for How Spaying/Neutering Affects the Dog Glandular System

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Feb 06, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: How Spaying/Neutering Affects the Dog Glandular System
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Britni,

You wrote, "Do you have any thoughts on how the glandular system is affected when dogs are de-sexed?"

While in veterinary school, great emphasis is placed on what is 'normal' for a healthy 'intact' reproductive tract. De-sexing, (that is spaying and neutering) does a great deal to alter that balance.

But the 'imbalance' that is created is accepted as a trade-off for the benefits to controlling population growth in dogs and cats, and controlling 'bad' habits that are unacceptable in maintaining dogs and cats as pets.

For example, tom cats fight, roam and urine mark their territory.

Intact male dogs urine mark their territory and some attempt to mount other dogs, (male or female), humans, or inanimate objects!

The product you mentioned, Pet GO Powder — Glandular Supplement For Dogs and Cats, seems to combine together EVERYTHING, sort of a 'shot gun' effect. As if you are not sure what would be best, so just give it ALL!

I would suggest you check out Standard Process. I have used their glandular products for over 20 years, and found they are much more 'specific' as to replacing or providing support for a particular problem.
https://www.standardprocess.com/Home

Feeding a Raw diet and using Standard Process products, along with homeopathic remedies, acupuncture, and/or herbal supplements should help to keep a healthy balance in your dog.

I am not sure if your neutered pets are showing some problems and that is why you have posed the question or not. My thoughts are that neutering does alter the glandular balance, but I do not recommend a specific glandular supplement just because they are neutered. Only if they are showing some symptoms of illness.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.





Feb 06, 2013
Neutering and the glandular system
by: Britni

Thank you for the information. The reason why we are hesitant to get our male fixed is because he has a very balanced temperament. Will fixing him change this? Do you recommend any glandular support after they are fixed? I'm mainly concerned with the adrenal glands, since they usually will pick up the slack once they are fixed am I correct? If we don't fix him do male dogs get "sexually frustrated" if they can't reproduce?

Feb 07, 2013
My Online Vet Response For: How Spaying/Neutering Affects the Dog Glandular System
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Britni,
You wrote,
"he has a very balanced temperament. Will fixing him change this?"

NOT at ALL!! His temperament is not determined solely by his testosterone!! Sexual habits such as mounting behavior, urine marking, aggression toward other intact males ARE determined by testosterone and those are the habits that will change (or stop!)

You wrote,
"Do you recommend any glandular support after they are fixed? I'm mainly concerned with the adrenal glands, since they usually will pick up the slack once they are fixed am I correct?"

No, I do not recommend any glandular support after they are fixed. You are correct, the adrenal glands DO produce both male and female hormones. Although, once they are spayed or neutered, I have not found adrenal 'collapse' to be an issue. The adrenal glands do not seem to go into 'hyper' drive to make up the difference in lack of hormones. Hence, the absence of the sexual habits I mentioned earlier.

You wrote,
"If we don't fix him do male dogs get "sexually frustrated" if they can't reproduce?"

Not that I have been able to tell with 33 years of veterinary experience. I believe that is attempting to apply a 'human' trait to a dog.

Although, intact male dogs can have more aggression toward other 'intact' male dogs compared to their interaction with neutered dogs.

And of course, an intact male will become very excited if he is around a female dog that is in heat. But I have not seen the dog that has been 'denied' a female show any outward symptoms or depressing behaviors/sadness/frustration(?) because he was not allowed to mate with the female. Once he is out of her presence and can no longer detect the scent (!) of the female, I would say 100% of males seem to go about their normal behavior!


Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman


DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



Feb 07, 2013
How Spaying/Neutering Affects the Dog Glandular System
by: Britni

Thank you so much for all the information!! The reason why I was so hesitant to get him fixed was because I didn't feel conformable with the information I had. Now I feel comfortable fixing him with the information you provided. I also have 2 options when getting him fixed
1. I can get him fixed at a conventional vets office (I have to sign a waiver for no vaccinations, since we don't vaccinate- he had an allergic reaction when he was younger and he is also allergic to topical flea meds.)
2. I can have him fixed at a holistic vets office.
Is there any significant difference between the two?
Also do you recommend having pre-anesthesia blood work done?

Feb 08, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: How Spaying/Neutering Affects the Dog Glandular System
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Britni,

You asked 'What is the difference between a Holistic Veterinary office vs Conventional Veterinary office?'

Not all holistic vets do surgery but of the ones that do seem to provide more individual care per patient. They offer holistic pain relief, homeopathic remedies or Acupuncture, Chinese herbs, Western herbs, etc. Compared to some conventional vet offices where routine surgeries are more like an 'assembly line'.

You asked,
"Do you recommend having pre-anesthesia blood work done?"

Yes, even though your Beagle is only 3 years old, a blood panel would be a excellent idea. Only if to obtain a normal baseline for him at this time. And to rule out any 'early' diseases that may not show up as clinical signs. Also, if there WERE some abnormalities, then a holistic vet would be MUCH better than a conventional vet for treatment!

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

Related Pages:
- Alternative Medicine for Dogs

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.








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