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Growth Between Dog's Paw Pads

by Juli F.
(Allentown, PA, USA)

Growth Between Dog's Paw Pads

Growth Between Dog's Paw Pads

Growth Between Dog's Paw Pads
Close-Up: Growth Between Dog's Paw Pads
Laying in little sister's bed with ball

I just noticed a growth (see pic) between the bottom of my dog's toe pads on her rear foot. It looks like a nail growth but not as firm/hard as a nail. It's more like the consistency of the pad itself.


Background info: My dog is a 10.5 month female Doberman. On her initial visit to vet, I spoke about some eye discharge that seemed a bit excessive. He advised to flush tear ducts when she gets spayed. He did give me some ointment for "conjunctivitis" and it seemed to help a bit, but not clear up completely.

He also suggested she go through a first heat cycle to help her growth and hormones. Sometimes this will help build up her immune system as well.

After her first cycle, I brought her in to get spayed. He was concerned because her weight seemed a bit low, and she had also developed acne on her chin and lips as well as a papilloma wart on her gum line.

He ran some blood work to rule out a hemophilia disease common in Dobermans and everything came back negative.

I began feeding her additional dry food along with wet food. She has been on Taste of the Wild grain free dry food and I supplement 3/4 can of 4health grain free wet food.

Her acne has now cleared up with a combination of my "spa" treatments (warm compresses followed by hydrogen peroxide). I had also followed vets orders of mupirocin 2x's daily for 1 week, then 1x's daily for another week.

Through research on my own I also began adding 1000mg fish oil and 1/8 tsp vitamin c powder to her food. She also seems to like the coconut oil I take daily, so I will give her a little dollop, about 1 tsp. Her papilloma wart is almost gone as well.

This growth on her foot does not seem to bother her. However, over the past couple of weeks, she has been hesitant on giving me the ball to throw.

She is a ball maniac and would play throw all day if possible. Now, she takes one or two throws and seems happy, but hesitant to give me the ball for additional throws. I don't know if this has anything to do with it or not, but I thought I would mention it.

There is no limp, no licking otherwise.

Thanks so much. I am interested to see if you have come across this in the past. I wonder if its even possible that she stepped on something and her skin grew around it? Or perhaps it is related to her immune system.

I would like to get her spayed but I don't want to take away what nature can provide as far as her immune system is concerned. I can always wait another cycle before spaying.

Comments for Growth Between Dog's Paw Pads

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Apr 25, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Growth Between Dog's Paw Pads
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Juli,

From the photos of your beautiful Doberman, this appears to be a 'corn'. Technically an overgrowth of keratin tissue, usually associated with the pads of the toes. These are caused by *trauma*/friction, (such as chasing the ball), but can be seen on the skin too.

Massage some of your coconut oil on this corn especially at the base where it is attached to the skin. You should be able to just pull it off. In most cases there is no bleeding.

All of the other issues she has been dealing with:
Eye discharge, chin acne, wart on gums are all due to vaccinations. She should be fine having surgery for being spayed, but have VERY few vaccinations, or consider just antibody titers to monitor her level of protection. A holistic veterinarian can write an exemption form for her.

Diet is also very important, and you have taken some steps in the right direction. See our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options, and consider a Raw diet for her. That would be the optimal way to ensure she has the best immune support and maintain good health.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman


DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Apr 26, 2013
thanks!
by: Juli

Thanks for your help. I did rub some coconut oil on it especially around the base. However, it is quite attached. The only issue with the coconut oil is that she can smell it a mile away. She comes running when I open the jar. So she was busy licking it all off her paw afterwards, lol.

Apr 26, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Growth Between Dog's Paw Pads
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Juli,

In some cases, the 'corn' is firmly attached and I have needed to use a local anesthetic to assist in removing it. (Along with softening it with mineral oil or glycerin).

Although, it may be possible to slowly 'loosen' it over the next 7-10 days by using the coconut oil two times daily.

If it is still not coming off, and you are causing more irritation (and pain!), it may be best to take him in to a holistic veterinarian or a conventional veterinarian for their opinion.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

Related Pages:
- Dog Warts
- Dog Skin Conditions
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Warts, Cysts and Strange Growths Section


DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



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