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Dog's eyeball rolled back

by Robin
(Bluefield WV)

Just last week at the vet, my dog's eyes checked out perfectly. When she woke up on May 5, one eye was closed shut. When it started to open, the eyeball was rolled back and I could only see white.

It seemed to bother her because she kept rubbing it on the rug. It got better as the day went on. Her eyes are "running" but the liquid seems clear.

Today is much better. I'm thinking maybe an allergy? I recently changed her dog treats. I'd hate not to get her looked at if this is serious BUT we've just been to the vet.

Anything you can advise would help. Our dog is a 12+ year old, female basset hound.

Thank you,
Robin

Comments for Dog's eyeball rolled back

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May 07, 2012
My Online Vet Response for: Dog's eyeball rolled back
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Robin,
From the symptoms you have described for your 12 year old Bassett Hound, I am very suspicious that the problem may be 'HORNER'S SYNDROME' (Her eyeball has NOT rolled back, merely her eye has sunken inward a small amount.)

There are 3 signs that are characteristic:

1. Raised 3rd eyelid-actually caused by the eyeball sinking back, allowing the third eyelid to raise up
2. Constriction of the pupil of that eye
3. Drooping of the upper eyelid. (In a Bassett Hound this may be a little difficult to determine, since most of a Bassett hound's face IS drooping!)

Horner's syndrome is caused by damage to the sympathetic nerve to the eye. The damage may have numerous causes, and may occur anywhere along the course of the nerve's route from the brain to the eye. Thus Horner's syndrome may be associated with brain tumor, spinal cord injury in the neck, tumor in the chest, injuries to the neck from fighting, choke collar injury, middle ear infections, or auto-immune mediated illness.

In most cases, spontaneous recovery can occur in 3-4 months. But because of your dog's age (as a 12 year old she may be more likely to have a tumor than if she were a younger dog), I would advise a thorough physical examination to rule out any of the other possible causes of Horner's syndrome. It may be prudent to do blood work and a chest x-ray, and there is a pharmacologic test done by the ophthalmologist which may further localize the site of the lesion.

You might also want to seek the help of a holistic veterinarian once a diagnosis has been made. Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.




May 08, 2012
dog's eyeball
by: Robin

Thank you, Doctor. The problem seems to have gone away in just three days although her eyes have been "running" for quite a long time. As you mentioned, she is quite old, 12 is a conservative guess because she was a rescue dog.
Robin

May 09, 2012
My Online Vet Response for: Dog's eyeball rolled back
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Robin,
That is great news!! Hopefully, it was only a transient problem, but if it recurs, then it would be a good idea to get her checked out by a veterinary ophthalmologist. Or consider seeking out a holistic veterinarian.

In the meantime, it might be prudent to improve her diet, to maintain her health, and prevent a relapse. DO NOT feed her any dry dog food. See our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options, and consider a RAW diet.

Also, I would advise NO MORE vaccinations. See the info from Current Veterinary Therapy XI text book, regarding "Annual Vaccinations". A holistic veterinarian will be able to write an exemption form for Rabies vaccination, and all other vaccinations.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Related Pages:
- Dog Eye Problems,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Eye Problems Section
- Canine Tumors (Dog Cancer),
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Canine Tumors/Dog Cancer Section



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