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Dog with Late Onset Seizures

by Midge
(Vineland, NJ USA)

I have an 18 year old miniature Daschund named Hazel, who has just presented with seizure activity. She had a seizure on Monday morning about 10am and one this evening about 7pm.


I have read that presentation this late in life is probably indicative of something other than the epilepsy that can be treated by potassium bromide or phenobarbital. I am wondering if some type of nutrient deficiency or perhaps a brain tumor.

Having visited my local vet last month for an “upper respiratory infection”, Hazel had some x-rays taken and there was no indication of tumor at that time. Hazel was placed on an antibiotic and Enalapril due to something they saw on the x-ray concerning her veins.

We have exhausted the supply of antibiotics, yet she still seems congested. We have been giving her Zyrtec for the congestion, also at the suggestion of the vet. There is a lot of mucus around her mouth during her seizures.

Obviously, I want these seizures to cease as quickly as possible especially due to her advanced age. Her seizures are typical except that she is extremely active AFTER the seizure. From everything I have read, this is unusual, as the activeness usually occurs pre-seizure.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Comments for Dog with Late Onset Seizures

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Nov 08, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Dog with Late Onset Seizures
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

November 8, 2013

Hi Midge,
For Hazel to start having seizures at 18 years of age, I would also be concerned about brain tumors. Most nutritional or metabolic deficiencies should be detected in a full blood panel. Anemia, low blood sugar, and liver disease will cause seizures. Has Hazel had a full blood panel done?

You wrote,
"Hazel was placed on an antibiotic and Enalapril due to something they saw on the x-ray concerning her veins....finished the antibiotics, yet she still seems congested.... giving her Zyrtec for the congestion... There is a lot of mucus around her mouth during her seizures".

Chest and skull x-rays will not show a brain tumor. It would require an MRI.

In answer to your request to stop the seizures as quickly as possible, (she has had 2 seizures in the past week), using conventional drugs, I suggest using injectable liquid diazepam, (Valium) giving it into her rectum. NO NEEDLE! This is not holistic, but should decrease her anxiety/restlessness and hopefully prevent a new seizure from occurring, while you are doing a blood panel and providing support for her immune system, replacing any nutrients, improving her diet, etc.

For her heart, she should also be taking CoEnzyme Q-10, (about 10-20 mg TWO times daily) for a miniature Dachsund.

Now, regarding the congestion and mucous around her mouth, this may be due to rotten teeth or a canine tooth abscess extending up into the nasal sinus. Also, if she has poor circulation, this will also decrease healing time, and will not help maintain healthy brain tissue.

1. Missing Link Canine Formula
2. Immuplex from Standard Process
3. OrthoMolecular Specialties, Mega C Powder

Feed her a GOOD diet, NO dry dog food. See our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options, http://www.organic-pet-digest.com/10-best-dog-food-options.html, and consider a RAW diet for her. Depending on the results of a blood panel there may be other supplements you will need to give her. I would also advise she have a B-vit/B-12 injection one time per week.

Also, consider a holistic veterinarian to 'take the case' for more specific homeopathic remedies indicated for seizures that are followed by increased activity.

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



Nov 08, 2013
Appreciation and Clarification
by: Midge

Dear Dr. Tillman,

Thank you so much for such thorough comments.

Hazel has not had a full blood panel recently; however, based on your comments I am inclined to believe (or hope)that her problem may indeed be nutritional as we have recently run out of the senior vitamins she has been on for the last two years.
I also need some clarification:
Are the following links that were listed above in fact, your recommendations or merely an embedded advertisement?
1. Missing Link Canine Formula
2. Immuplex from Standard Process
3. OrthoMolecular Specialties, Mega C Powder

As to your recommendation for her heart: is that in addition to the Enalapril or in lieu of it?

I will indeed be changing her diet and making her food at home from now on. Again, a heartfelt thank you for your time and expertise. You will hear from me again very soon, as I have an 11 year old Standard Daschund named Cody who is diabetic and blind. I would love your input as to how to support his health in his latter years.

Nov 09, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Dog with Late Onset Seizures
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

November 8, 2013

Hi Midge,

You wrote,
"Are the following links that were listed...your recommendations or merely an embedded advertisement?"

1. Missing Link Canine Formula
2. Immuplex from Standard Process
3. OrthoMolecular Specialties, Mega C Powder

Yes, these are products that I do recommend.

*Missing Link* contains whole vitamin and minerals essential for canines,
*Immuplex* is a glandular supplement to support a healthy immune system, and
*Mega C* is a product developed by veterinarian Dr Belfield in San Jose, California, which contains vitamins and minerals plus MEGA doses of buffered Vitamin C.

Any of these products would be a good addition to Hazel's diet. (or maybe just start with the Immuplex for Hazel, considering her delicate GI tract!)

You wrote,
"As to your recommendation for her heart: is that in addition to the Enalapril or in lieu of it?"
Co-Enzyme Q-10 would be in addition to the Enalapril for her heart.

You wrote,
"I will indeed be changing her diet and making her food at home from now on. Again, a heartfelt thank you for your time and expertise."

You are very welcome! And I will be happy to help with your other dog, Cody!

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



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