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Dog with Inflammatory Intestinal Disease

by Ronelle
(Charlotte, NC)

Snooper and Daisy

Snooper and Daisy

Snooper and Daisy
Stool
Stool
Stool

I am the privileged owner of two boxer dogs: Snooper and Daisy, brother and sister. DOB: 12-13-2009. They have not been apart a day in their lives and absolutely love each other.


Approximately 2 years ago my dog Snooper had his 1st episode. This happened again approximately 6 month later and again approximately 3-6 month later and again more frequently. Most recently, Snooper has experienced these symptoms going on for 8 weeks continuously now. He is sick every other day or every 3-5 days.

I have always taken him to the vet and they would give a prescription, however they never seem to know what exactly the problem is and always recommend a diet change.

About 2 months ago, when his symptoms started again, I took him the vet again.
They ran blood test, urine, checked for Addison’s, heartworm, parasites. Everything came back normal.

Since Snooper has these recurring issues, they referred me to an internal specialist. They did another extensive Addison’s disease test and an abdominal ultrasound, only to find some inflammation in the intestines.

I have to make another appointment to discuss further treatment, but I have not called yet. I feel so discouraged and have done some searches online in the hopes to help make him better.

They did give me a 14 day Antibiotic Metronidazole, 500 mg tablet- give 1 tablet orally twice a day, which I discontinued on day 9 since Snooper got sick again.

Snooper’s Symptoms:

This normally happens in the morning. He will have a gurgle stomach, not feel well; obviously it is uncomfortable for him. Sometimes, he will pant. Sometimes he will throw up vile from dinner the night before, or sometimes when I can get him to eat, he will throw up his breakfast. Most of the time, he does not feel well and won’t eat at all.

A lot of times he will have diarrhea and on a really bad day he will pass mucus and diarrhea, and mucus and blood and diarrhea on very bad days.

1) I have a attached a picture of the mucus and blood stool when he had a very bad day – This was taken approx. 8 weeks ago – prior to taking him to vet and intestinal specialist.

2) I also attached a stool picture taken several weeks ago when he had a bad day. The stool looks normal however, the outerside seems a little bloody.

3) I also attached a picture of a mixture of (diarhea / mucus / grass) He was eating grass that day to make himself feel better and obviously past this mixture of blood and mucus.

Some days are worse than others. He will also walk around the yard and try to go and have diarrhea (straining) a lot. You can tell he is hurting inside.

He will sometimes eat grass to make him feel better or throw up. Its terrible to see him suffer.

I did research on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) / Colitis and I know the breed is susceptible to it.

Food history:

The 1st year I have them on Purina Puppy (then I wised up.)

2nd and 3rd year I had them on Blue Buffalo, Chicken and Brown Rice.

(After one episode the vet suggested to get away from grain) I changed to Natural Balance Venison and Sweet Potato for almost a year.

About 3 months ago I bought a bag of Natural Choice Sensitive Stomach venison and brown rice.
That did not help.

Approximately 3 weeks ago, I eliminated all dog food and started cooking, chicken, rice, mixed veg, sweet potato, regular potato etc. (This is not all given at once. I tried these ingredients in stages.)

About a week and a half ago, I bought a bag of holistic Dog food, since I read great reviews about dogs that have colitis, I had to try this.
Canine Caviar Holistic Special Needs Chicken Dry Dog Food. I am still mixing rice and a little chicken and veg and a little dog food together.

Sometimes he gets just dog food, some times a mixture of home cooked and little dog food. Sometimes just the home cooked.

I also bought some digestive enzymes and giving 1/4 teaspoon per meal. I also got some Slippery Elm drops and placing 2-3 drops in every meal for inflammation.

I bought some L-Glutamine (But have not given yet.) I need to still Google the dosages and so nervous to introduce too much to him now.

They have not been on heartworm medication in a few months. I had that test done too (negative) and received a prescription, however have not filled it. I am so scared to give him anything now, since he is so sensitive. I have also given smaller meals a few times a day rather than just breakfast and dinner.

I will go back to the internal specialist, but I was hoping I am not the only dog owner with this problem. Please let me know if you have any information for me.

I have stayed home from work and my husband has taken off work to go to all the vet appointments. I feel at a loss.

Below is a history of Snoopers medication and the internal specialist results. I just copied from our vet (website).

Snooper and Daisy do not eat anything strange outside anymore, since they were puppies. He had chin acne once and received medication for that.

We keep them in the yard when we at work, however, I have been keeping them inside to eliminate the possibility of him eating something strange outside. Even doing so, he is still getting sick or not feeling well every few days.

Regular VET history of prescriptions:

Item Date Quantity
Clindamycin 150mg capsule
Please give 2 capsules by mouth twice daily until all medication has been given. 2011-11-23 40.0
Cephalexin Capsules 500mg
Please give 1 capsule by mouth twice daily until all medication has been given. 2013-05-02 28.0
Cephalexin Capsules 250mg
Please give 1 capsule by mouth twice daily until all medication has been given. 2013-05-02 28.0
Famotidine 20mg
Please give 1 tablet by mouth twice daily. 2012-12-26 14.0
Metronidazole 500 mg tablets
Please give 3 tablets by mouth once followed by 1 and 1/2 tablets by mouth twice daily until all medication has been given. 2012-12-26 24.0
Doxycycline Tablets 100mg
Please give 1 and 1/2 tablets orally twice daily until gone. Follow with food or water to ensure complete swallowing. 2013-02-12 21.0

INTERNAL SPECIALIST RESULTS
Subjective/Complaints: Snoop presented today for chronic diarrhea and vomiting which started approximately 2 years ago. His diarrhea is occasionally bloody, mucous. Owners report that they originally thought he was eating something outside and since they have been keeping him inside. They have also changed different novel protein diets. Currently, he is only occasionally vomiting and having diarrhea and has been eating and drinking normally. He is not on any medications at this time.
Temperature (Fº): 101.9 Fº
Pulse (bpm): 140 bpm
Respiration: pant
Mucous Membranes: pink
CRT (sec): <2 sec
Pulse quality: good
Attitude: BAR
Hydration: adequate
Physical Exam Findings:
Mentation: bright, alert and responsive.
Cardiovascular: no murmur or arrhythmia noted, pulses were strong and synchronous.
Respiratory: eupneic, with normal bronchovesicular lung sounds in all fields.
Abdomen: soft and non-painful on palpation. No obvious masses or organomegaly noted.
Rectal Exam: no masses, lymphadenopathy or foreign material noted. Stool was normal in color and consistency.
Peripheral Lymph Nodes: palpate normal in size and texture.
Eyes, Ears, Nose, Throat: direct and consensual pupillary light reflex present and appropriate OU. No significant abnormalities noted.
Hair Coat: in good condition for age and breed.
Cutaneous: no significant abnormalities noted.
Oral Cavity: grade 2/4 periodontal disease. Mucous membranes are pink and moist, with no evidence of petechiation or ulceration. No foreign objects noted.
Musculoskeletal: adequate musculature, no evidence of weakness or lameness during ambulation, no obvious orthopedic abnormalities noted (complete orthopedic exam not performed).
Neurologic: no obvious neurologic deficits noted (complete neurologic exam not performed).
Hydration: adequately hydrated
Wt 37.8 Kg
Laboratory tests:
Abdominal Ultrasound
Bladder: No Gross Abnormalities
Prostate: No Gross Abnormalities
Kidneys: Both were imaged and had good corticomedullary junctions.
Right: No Gross Abnormalities
Left: No Gross Abnormalities
Adrenals: No Gross Abnormalities
Spleen: No Gross Abnormalities
Liver: No Gross Abnormalities
Gall Bladder: No Gross Abnormalities
Pancreas: No Gross Abnormalities
Stomach: No Gross Abnormalities
Bowel: Diffusely thickened bowel loops measuring between 4.7 and 6.2 mm
Lymph Nodes: No enlarged lymph nodes were seen in the abdomen.
Other: No free fluid
Comments (AbdUS): Changes seen within the small bowel are consistent with inflammatory intestinal disease. The remainder of the examination is WNL
Assessment:
Chronic diarrhea and vomiting (R/O Addisons disease, Boxer colitis, IBD, etc.)
Plan:
It was discussed differing causes of chronic diarrhea including addisons disease and colitis (in particular Boxer colitis). Based off of his ACTH stimulation test Addisons disease is less likely. Based on these results and Snoop's ultrasound findings we suspect he has inflammatory intestinal disease. This condition is definitively diagnosed via biopsy and endoscopic biopsies were discussed today as a possible future diagnostic step. At this time we will start Snoop on metronidazole as treatment for the suspected inflammation and we would like to recheck Snoop in two weeks.
Medications:
Metronidazole, 500 mg tablet- give 1 tablet orally twice a day.
*Immuno-modulatory and anti-diarrhea
*Antibiotic

I would greatly appreciate any suggestions or comments.

Thank you for your time.

Ronelle

PS: Snooper has the blue collar. :)

Comments for Dog with Inflammatory Intestinal Disease

Click here to add your own comments

Nov 22, 2013
My Online Vet Response For: Dog with Inflammatory Intestinal Disease
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

November 21, 2013

Hi Ronelle,
Snooper and Daisy are adorable! I cannot guarantee that I can cure him, but I hopefully, we will get him on the road to recovery, and feeling more comfortable! Irritable Bowel Disease, IBD, is a very common problem. It occurs in my patients that are over vaccinated, easily stressed, have a high energy, active lifestyle and have been fed over processed dry dog food. There can be genetic/inherited issues involved, so I am glad that Daisy is ok, so far!

Treatment can take weeks or months to resolve/control. But you should start to see some improvement within the first one to two weeks.

Here's the plan:
1. Feed a simple diet that is easily digestible. NO dry dog food. Divide the meals 3-4 times daily.
If Snooper weighs 50lbs feed 800 calories per day
60lbs feed 950 calories per day
70lbs feed 1,050 calories/day

50% Protein (lightly cooked/rare chicken, turkey, beef or lamb)

49% Carbohydrate (mixed steamed/cooked vegetables of 1/3 yam, 1/3 green beans, 1/3 carrots)

NO GRAINS at this time

1% Fat Add 1-2 teaspoons of Coconut oil to each meal

2. Canine Whole Body Support by Standard Process is a vit/mineral supplement powder. Order from Amazon.com. Dose depends on body weight and is listed on the label.

3. Probiotics/acidophilus such as PB8. Open and sprinkle one capsule into each meal 3-4 times daily.

4. Homeopathic remedy NUX VOMICA 6C or 12C. Give Snooper one pellet by mouth 2 times daily. Or dissolve one pellet in a 2 oz glass dropper bottle in Spring Water, and shake the bottle 20 times by hitting it against the palm of your hand prior to each dose, give Snooper 1/2 dropperful by mouth two times daily. (The liquid form is usually easier to give.)

5. Continue Slippery Elm and give one dose 4-6 times daily (Check the label and give 1/3 dose for a human).

TO BE CONTINUED IN PART TWO

Nov 22, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Dog with Inflammatory Intestinal Disease PART TWO
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

November 21, 2013

Hi Ronelle,
Here is the rest of my response.

6. NO VACCINATIONS! In fact, I am suspicious that vaccines may be the cause of IBD. Holistic veterinarians call this syndrome, 'vaccinosis'.

Once he starts to respond to this regime, you can resume his Heartgard, but only give it every 45 days NOT every 30 days. If the dogs need to have any flea/tick preventive use EVOLV by http://www.wondercide.com. All natural and made from cedar oil.

And when his stool is more consistently formed, after 2-3 months, then we can transition to a canned and/or RAW diet depending on his response.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman


P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!


DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.


Nov 22, 2013
One of my dogs has this also
by: Gina Frias

Hi,

One of my dogs has this. I fixed it by not allowing him to go more than 7 hours without a meal. I feed him 1 lb of raw meat at 8am. Another 1 lb of raw meat at 3pm and then the big meal for dinner so he will go to bed with a full stomach and not wake up with any stomach problems like you have described. At 10pm I give him dinner I feed him 2cups of Sojos grain free, one potato (potatoes are natural anti-inflammatory), one banana, one cup of broccoli, and one cup of mangoes (or whatever fresh fruit I got from market). He is 80lbs so if you plan to do this diet make sure to give enough for your smaller dog.

Nov 22, 2013
My Online Vet Response For: Dog with Inflammatory Intestinal Disease
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

November 22, 2013

Hi Gina,
Thank you for your input. It is important to feed meals more frequently. Since dogs have 10 times more HCl (Hydrochloric acid) in their stomach than people, they are more likely to also have 'acid indigestion' along with IBD.

Hopefully, Ronelle, will be able to adjust Snooper's diet to help him too!

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.


Nov 23, 2013
Snooper
by: Ronelle

Dear Dr. Tillman,

Thank you for your e-mail and recommendations. I was easily able to find all the supplements you suggested online and will proceed with ordering these. I wanted to check on the protein's you recommend. Do I need to choose one? or can I alternate these every day, every other day?

Snooper is approximately 85 lbs, so I will attempt to feed 1,200 calories per day? He is taller than most boxers and in good health other than the stomach issues.

I wanted to ask, once I start the diet and supplements you suggested, do I need to discontinue the "Digestive Enzymes Supplement" I am giving him now?

Snooper and Daisy also get doggie milk bones as a snack during the day, which I will obviously discontinue when I start the diet. I have also been making some home made dog biscuits for them recently (in the hopes that it is better for him.) I saw Gina's comment on "Sojos" and not heard of it, "Thanks Gina" I googled the brand and saw that they have grain free dog biscuits. Could I give him these instead as a snack? or do you have other dog treat snack suggestions?

Unfortunately, I live in a state that requires vaccinations, but they not due again till next year.

Thank you so much for your advice!
Regards,
Ronelle

Nov 24, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Dog with Inflammatory Intestinal Disease
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

November 24, 2103
Hi Ronelle,
This response was copied in another thread, Dog with Chronic Diarrhea, but I can answer it in both places.

For Snooper-
1. The protein source (chicken, beef, turkey, or lamb) should remain the same for 3-4 days before changing. Alternating every day or every other day may cause GI upsets.

2. For 85 lbs body weight, Snooper should get 1,250 calories per day. Of course, you can divide this into 3-4 meals per day. (So, if he was fed four times daily, he would need about 312 calories per meal.)

3. Correct-no digestive enzymes would be needed.

4. For treats, it would be best to stick to raw or cooked vegetables and fruit. Such as, raw or cooked baby carrots, cooked green beans, pieces of apple, cantaloupe or melon.

5. Regarding vaccinations, RABIES is the only vaccination that is required by law. See if you can locate a holistic veterinarian nearby that could write an exemption form for Snooper to 'excuse' him from this vaccine. Hopefully, he is back to normal next year, but if he gets a vaccination, it could cause a relapse in his IBD.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Nov 26, 2013
Snooper
by: Ronelle

Thank you Dr. Tillman.
I appreciate your help.

I will let you know how it goes.
Regards,
Ronelle

Jan 25, 2015
My Boxer has this too!! 4 years and the saga continues!!
by: Anonymous

Have you found a remedy, solution, explanation?? Our Louie was food allergy tested. Allergic to: poultry mix, sweet potato, peas, soy, corn, barley, turkey, chicken.
Now eats Royal Canin Hydrolized protein. Still every other day reactions. Vet says next step ultra sound at $360. Sure it will tell us nothing.
Any help is appreciated if the suggested items worked for you.
Thanks!

Jan 25, 2015
My Online Vet Response for: Dog with Inflammatory Intestinal Disease
by: Dr Carol Jean Tillman

January 25, 2015

Dear Anonymous,
Thanks for your question.
There has been no further update from Ronelle on her Boxer, Snooper. (from November 2013)

Sorry to hear about your own dog, Louie.

I'm happy to help, but we only accept new questions from subscribers (the original question above was from a subscriber).
Please click here to sign up and submit your question and photos. I'll then get back to you right away at the bottom of your newly created web page.

Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

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