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Dog with dandruff-type skin condition, itching and odor

by Jolanta Bremer
(Sarasota, FL)




My dog has developed this dandruff-type skin condition. I tried oatmeal shampoo (or at least I instructed the groomer to use it) as well as coconut oil to put on his skin. With that, there is a strong body odor, not sure if its related but seems to be...


His main food is "taste of the wild" with roasted bison & venison and for a treat I feed him Pedigree's Marro Bone (bite size). I recently bought Pedigree bag to change it up a bit. He's been on Taste of the Wild for over 2 years.

I also give him Trifexis for fleas, ticks, hart worm, etc.

Sincerely,
Jolanta Bremer

Comments for Dog with dandruff-type skin condition, itching and odor

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Nov 03, 2011
My Online Vet Response for Dog with dandruff-type skin condition, itching and odor
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Jolanta,
What a cute puppy you have! Thank you for the photos. It looks like the dandruff is mostly over the hindquarter area, and I do not see any areas of hair loss. In this situation, I have found that adjusting the diet will be the most important way to correct the dry skin, and also the itching and body odor.

Taste of the Wild food is a good brand, but it is DRY. Also the Pedigree Marro Bone for treats are DRY, and the Pedigree bag food is DRY. (And both Pedigree products contain preservatives BHA and BHT, which is NOT healthy for your dog.)

I noted that the Pedigree Marro Bone says, 'promotes healthy teeth' but does NOT say, TARTAR Control. Pedigree does make some tartar control treats which would be better than the Marro Bone treats (click here for other tarter control dog treats for dog dental hygiene).

As for the main diet, it would be best to feed a diet that contains moisture. Either a canned food without preservatives, or consider a RAW diet. See our page on 10 Best Dog food options, and check out some of the products listed. Healthy treats for your dog should include raw carrots, slices of apple or cantaloupe. Anything dry or hard should say that it is a TARTAR CONTROL treat.

Oatmeal shampoo is good to use when there is a lot of itching or scratching. I am not sure if the groomer is completely rinsing it off, though.

Also, the coconut oil is usually applied and massaged into the skin and left on for 1-2 hours to allow it to soak in to the skin. Then, a 'detergent' such as Palmolive or Dawn Dish Soap is used to shampoo off the oil. This is then followed by the oatmeal shampoo, and then rinsed thoroughly. I have not found any dog to develop a body odor after this treatment. You may need to ask the groomer how they are doing it. The oil soak/oatmeal shampoo can be done 1-2 times per week if needed.

In my opinion, some dogs may need to also have some Omega 3 fish oil for dogs
added to the diet to also help the coat. Adding 500 mg for a 30lb dog twice daily to the food should help with itching and dry skin.

You did not mention if any dog vaccinations were recently given. A vaccine may have been the 'trigger' that started this susceptibility to dermatitis. In this case a holistic veterinarian should be consulted to work with you more in depth on treating 'vaccinosis'. Especially, if an improvement in diet is not helpful.


TO BE CONTINUED IN PART TWO.

Nov 03, 2011
My Online Vet Response for Dog with Dandruff-type skin condition, itching and odor PART TWO
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Jolanta,
Here is the continuation of my response.

Since you are located in Florida, heartworm is a threat for dogs, but I am concerned with the product you are using, Trifexis (a combination of Spinosad and Milbemycin). It protects against fleas, NOT ticks, and only works if the flea bites your dog, after which the flea dies.

It would be healthier to use a product with a single ingredient that prevents heartworm instead of a product with a combination of 'drugs/insecticides' that you are giving monthly. Taking in a stool sample twice a year to see if your dog has any intestinal parasites (and THEN give a deworming if needed, instead of every 30 days) and using some more natural flea/tick medicine/preventives such as Wondercide.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area.

Also, go to the AVH for a veterinarian knowledgeable in homeopathy.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Sep 05, 2012
Trifexis Skin Issues?
by: Anonymous

I'm on my second month of Trifexis with my JRTs. Both have developed a different, musky odor and my male who has alopecia x has developed acne on his back too. I can't correlate for sure, but both the unpleasant odor and acne both appeared in the last 4 weeks or so. I plan to go back to Heartguard and Frontline this month just to see if that clears things up.

Sep 05, 2012
My Online Vet Response for: Dog with dandruff-type skin condition, itching and odor
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hello,
Trifexis (a combination of Spinosad and Milbemycin) protects against fleas, NOT ticks, and only works if the flea bites your dog, after which the flea dies.

It would be healthier to use a product with a single ingredient that prevents heartworm instead of a product with a combination of 'drugs/insecticides' that you are giving monthly.

Heartgard would be better.

Instead of Frontline, I advise using a more natural flea/tick medicine/preventives such as Wondercide.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Related Pages:
- Dog Skin Conditions,
- Dog Itchy Skin,
- Dog Skin Rash,
- Dog Skin Allergies,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Skin Rashes, Marks, Spots, Lesions & Patches (including itchy skin and mange) Section

Aug 28, 2015
dog dandruff and body odor NEW
by: eva usher

how can I get rid of dog dandruff and body odor

Aug 28, 2015
My Online Vet Response for: Dog with Dandruff-type skin condition, itching and odor NEW
by: Dr Carol Jean Tillman

August 28, 2015

Dear Eva Usher,

At this time, I am no longer answering questions online. It would be best to take your dog to a veterinarian or, better yet, find a local holistic veterinarian to help.

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

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