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Dog skin lesions on leg, chest and underside that start with a white crust on top & come and go (Part 4)

by Gina Frias
(Guaynabo, PR)




Today I found some new crusty lesions. I wanted to show what they look like before I scrape the crust off of them. What do you think could be the cause of these thing?


Gina

(click here to go back to Part 1)

Comments for Dog skin lesions on leg, chest and underside that start with a white crust on top & come and go (Part 4)

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Oct 19, 2012
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Skin lesions on leg, chest and underside that start with a white crust on top & come and go (Part 4)
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Gina,
Great photos.

You wrote,
"Today I found some new crusty lesions. I wanted to show what they look like before I scrape the crust off of them. What do you think could be the cause of these things?"

You have photographed, 'Superficial Pyoderma'. This is commonly caused by bacteria found in the skin, specifically in the hair follicles. The bacteria create a small 'pus' pocket in the root of the hair(s), the hairs fall out, the pus pocket appears as a pimple, it 'pops' leaving a ring of crusty skin called a 'collarette'. This is the picture you have taken.

In a normal, healthy individual, bacteria in the skin do not cause a problem. Our skin is covered with microscopic bacteria, mites and other organisms, that do not cause any physical lesions. If an individual is NOT healthy, under stress, not eating correctly, has genetic deficiencies, over vaccinated, etc, etc, then the benign organisms can cause physical problems.

Good health, starts with good genetic make-up, minimal vaccinations, healthy (CLEAN) environment, proper diet, and lots of love!!

I think I have answered how to achieve most of the above in my previous responses.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Mar 08, 2013
14 y/o male Pomeranian
by: Ahrobling

My 14 y/o male Pomeranian who has a heart condition has been experiencing the same skin lesions for almost a year. My vet put him on super strong antibiotics and it clears it up.

What concerns me is that every so often my Pom will collapse. Last night he was barking at the vacuum as he normally does and when I looked back at him, he was on the floor lying on his side. I scooped him up and started calling his name, massaged his chest (heart) and attempted to blow in his mouth and nose.

Thankfully, he did come out of it. Albeit, his heart rate was slow and he was not moving much.


I am concerned that the antibiotic (Cephalexin 250 MG) and his heart medication (Enalapril 5mg) do not mix. I have discussed with my vet and pharmacist and they both agree there should be no side effects.

Mar 08, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Dog skin Lesions on leg, chest and underside that start with a white crust on top & come and go (Part 4)
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Ahrobling,
Regarding your 14 year old Pomeranian, with heart problems on Enalapril, you wrote,
"He has been experiencing skin lesions for almost a year. He takes the antibiotic Cephalexin and it clears up."

Now he has been collapsing.

If the antibiotic has cleared up the skin lesions, why have the lesions lasted almost a year? Or has he had to take the antibiotic for almost a year for the lesions to clear up? Or does he take them for awhile and the lesions clear up, and then they come back again?

Your veterinarian and pharmacist are correct, there is no drug interaction between Cephalexin and Enalapril. The problem lies in treatment of a 14 year old dog with a heart condition with long term antibiotics (which seems to be ineffective!) for a superficial skin problem.

Using holistic methods, improved diet, supporting his immune system and his heart, would be a much healthier solution for your dog.

The collapsing episodes may be a worsening of his heart condition from suppressive treatment with the antibiotic. Please go to a holistic veterinarian for more specific treatment.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

Related Pages:
- Dog Skin Conditions,
- Dog Itchy Skin,
- Dog Skin Rash,
- Dog Skin Allergies,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Skin Rashes, Marks, Spots, Lesions & Patches (including itchy skin and mange) Section,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Hair Loss Section

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

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