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Dog Liver Enzymes Are High

by Gina F.
(Guaynabo, Puerto Rico)



One of my dogs (age 6) had been getting fat, so I took her to 2 vets because she was drinking lots of water and was very anxious. Her liver enzymes were 700, so her diet was changed two times.


I boil chicken, fish, beef and I mix it but just a little. Sometimes a little of plain white rice.

What can I do to help her? I've been at it since last October. She doesn't drink as much water as before. I changed her diet to Royal Canine Weight Management. But she still drinks water in the evenings. She lost 3l lbs but hasn't been weighed since she weighed 67 lbs. She was 70lb before that.

The vet sent out for some pills to lower her enzymes, but I guess they haven't arrived yet and he didn't tell me the name of them. I'm worried about her health. She is active plays with my other dogs, and she is happy.

What do you recommend?

Thanks, Gina

Comments for Dog Liver Enzymes Are High

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May 11, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Liver Enzymes Are High
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

May 11, 2013

Hi Gina,

It is a bit difficult to read the lab work, as it comes out in the photo VERY small. I can see that the only liver enzyme that is elevated is the Alkaline Phosphatase, (Alk Phos). The other liver enzymes and remainder of the blood work is normal, (I think).

Your veterinarian is probably concerned that Lula (spelling?) has Cushing's disease. This is caused by the body's production of too much cortisone. Either from a growth on the adrenal gland, or due to increased stimulation from a growth on the pituitary in the brain. (This adreno-cortico-trophic hormone, called ACTH, is sent from the pituitary in the blood stream, down to the adrenal glands to stimulate them to produce cortisone.)

The problem is, the *liver* is VERY sensitive to cortisone, and in response you will see the increase in ALK PHOS enzyme.

Providing support for the liver AND the adrenal glands is of paramount importance. Therefore, the diet should be medium protein, HIGH carbohydrate and LOW fat. With your 'home-made' diet, you have done that very well. Perhaps adding MORE vegetables to the rice, and decreasing the meat slightly. Cooked green beans, carrots, zucchini, potatoes and yams are all good to add to the diet.

I am guessing that the medicine your vet has sent off for is Vetoryl, (trilostane). This acts on the adrenal, and works by stopping the production of cortisol in the adrenal glands. This may need to be given at first to get her a bit more stable.

In the meantime, give her Livaplex from Standard Process, (one capsule opened and sprinkled in her food TWO times daily). And milk thistle 500 mg two times daily. (available at any health food store).

DO NOT apply any flea or tick products on her and bathe her one time per week.
I am not able to prescribe any homeopathic remedy, as you have not given me enough information about her in order for me to 'take the case'. See how she does with the above suggestions, and using the Trilostane for now.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.


May 13, 2013
Reply
by: Gina Frias

Should I still feed the dry food Royal Canine weight management?
My dogs have the tick collar that the vet sold me. If I take it off am afraid they wil lget tick the area where I live is infested with ticks. What should I do?

Thanks, Gina

May 15, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Liver Enzymes Are High
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

May 14, 2013

Hi Gina,

Regarding liver disease, you wrote,

"Should I still feed the dry food Royal Canine weight management?"

That would be a good choice for providing a low fat diet. But DRY food is TOO hard for digestion. It would be far better to feed the canned Royal Canine weight management. And also add in some vegetables.

Regarding toxins, you wrote,

"My dogs have the tick collar that the vet sold me. If I take it off I am afraid they will get ticks, since the area where I live is infested with ticks. What should I do?

Check out Wondercide Quick Treat (Eco Treat + Evolve) a natural flea and tick preventive made from cedar oil. Hopefully, they can ship to Puerto Rico!

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

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Related Pages:
- 10 Best Dog Food Options
- Homemade Dog Food Recipes
- Dog Dietary Supplements
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Food Diet - Dog Food, Dog Treats & Homemade Dog Food Recipes Section

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

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