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Dog Gallbladder Stones

by Lisbeth

My husband took our dog to the vet because she was losing weight, she was diagnosed stones in her gallbladder, the vet put her on treatment: Zentonil 400 mg and Royal canin urinary.


Our dog put 4 lbs back and the vet said that she still has a stone and needs a cystotomy (canine).

I noticed today that she has blood on her pee and I am so worry about her, she probably feels very uncomfortable and that break my heart.

I would like to know your recommendation in this case, I read in your web that you treat and cure pets without surgery if possible, I urgently would like to know if any natural medicine at least can relieve her while we can do a treatment or surgery.

Name: Dulce
Age: 9 years
She is mix doggie
Condition: gallbladder stones
Weight 6 months ago:47 lbs
Weight a month ago: 41 lbs (lost 6 lbs)
Weight now: 45 lbs (put back 4 lbs after treatment)

Thanks,

Lisbeth

Comments for Dog Gallbladder Stones

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Aug 24, 2014
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Gallbladder Stones
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

August 23, 2014

Hi Lisbeth,

For Dulce to have *gall* bladder stones is a VERY rare condition in dogs!

The Royal Canin Urinary S/O food is for treatment of urinary bladder stones, and seeing blood in the urine would be a symptom of stones in the urinary bladder, NOT the gallbladder. Bladder stones (in the urinary bladder), are VERY common in dogs.

Your veterinarian also started Dulce on Zentolin (S-adenosyl methionine) which is a liver supplement. She may have some liver disease that was contributing to her weight loss.

Holistic treatment for Urinary bladder stones involves knowing if the stones are calcium oxalate or triple phosphate.

If Calcium Oxalate, then the urine pH was too acidic (less than 5.5-6) and caused the stones to form.

If Triple Phosphate, (which is more common) it is because the urine pH was too alkaline, (greater than 8-8.5) and caused the stones to form.

Therefore, feeding a diet that will adjust the pH accordingly is very important. To help make the urine more *acidic* you need to add more meat to the diet. To make the urine more *alkaline* you need to add more vegetables.

In BOTH cases, a canned food or homemade diet is necessary for dissolving the stones. DRY dog food will cause the urine to be too concentrated. A diet that is HIGH in moisture, such as a canned or homemade diet, is the best.

Also, cranberry concentrate added to the diet is very important to improve the health of the bladder and dissolve struvite crystals (or triple phosphate crystals). Carpon from Dr Belfield, OrthoMolecular Specialties is a great supplement for this problem. http://belfield.com/product/carpon-100-tablets/

You can use paper pH strips from a pharmacy or pool supply store to monitor Dulce's urine every morning and after she eats. NORMAL dog urine should be acidic:

pH= 6.0-6.5

Stones can take 3-6 months to dissolve. If Dulce's stones are SO large that she is having difficulty urinating NOW, then she may need to have surgery to remove them.

In the meantime, you might wish to seek the help of a holistic veterinarian to get a second opinion on blood work, to evaluate her liver, and to look at her x-rays. If x-rays were taken, to evaluate the size of the stones to determine if surgery is necessary, or if the stone(s) are not so large that she would be able to dissolve them without surgery.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



Sep 07, 2014
Dulce got surgery to remove the stones!
by: Anonymous

Dulce got surgery and all stones were removed, she is fine now, clarification she had bladder stones. Do you have any suggestion about what food should she take now, to protect her from stones. I am giving her filtered water and I am cooking for her right now. I will appreciate your comments.
-Lisbeth McNabb

Sep 07, 2014
Dulce got surgery to remove the stones!
by: Anonymous

Dulce got surgery and all stones were removed, she is fine now, clarification she had bladder stones. Do you have any suggestion about what food should she take now, to protect her from stones. I am giving to her filtered water and I am cooking for her right now. I will appreciate your comments.
-Lisbeth McNabb

Sep 11, 2014
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Gallbladder Stones
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

September 11, 2014

Dear Lisbeth,

Regarding the type of diet that Dulce should eat to PREVENT the recurrence of bladder stones, now that she has had them surgically removed, see my response in the previous posting. It depends on what type of stones formed in Dulce's bladder:

If Calcium Oxalate, then the urine pH was too acidic (less than 5.5-6) and caused the stones to form.

If Triple Phosphate, (which is more common) it is because the urine pH was too alkaline, (greater than 8-8.5) and caused the stones to form.

Therefore, feeding a diet that will adjust the pH accordingly is very important. To help make the urine more *acidic* you need to add more meat to the diet. To make the urine more *alkaline* you need to add more vegetables.

In BOTH cases, a canned food or homemade diet is necessary for both dissolving the stones, and preventing them from re-forming. DRY dog food will cause the urine to be too concentrated. A diet that is HIGH in moisture, such as a canned or homemade diet, is the best.

Also, cranberry concentrate added to the diet is very important to improve the health of the bladder and dissolve struvite crystals (or triple phosphate crystals). Carpon from Dr Belfield, OrthoMolecular Specialties is a great supplement for this problem. http://belfield.com/product/carpon-100-tablets/

You can use paper pH strips from a pharmacy or pool supply store to monitor Dulce's urine every morning and after she eats. NORMAL dog urine should be acidic:

pH= 6.0-6.5

You wrote,
"I am giving her filtered water and I am cooking for her right now. I will appreciate your comments."

Good job!! Although, homemade diets ARE a lot of work. If you would prefer to buy a 'commercial' diet for her, the BEST diet would be a RAW diet. See our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options, http://www.organic-pet-digest.com/10-best-dog-food-options.html.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.










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