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Dog Eye and Skin Irritations

by Brandi
(Joplin, MO, USA)



My dog Mattie has been itching, biting, and clawing herself to a raw mess. I assumed this was left over discomfort from the fleas (more on this in a moment), but it continues almost two weeks after she was treated.


Now she is targeting her eyes, rubbing violently and scratching them to raw bits. They are getting redder and redder and I am concerned that these might be related. Since they are getting worse and not better, I would appreciate your opinion.

Despite several (four now) thorough baths, the foul smell of her coat isn't improving at all and she continues to have flaky dandruff.

Now for some background... Mattie is a border collie that we rescued Thursday, November 4th. Her first trip to the vet after rescue (the same day), she got her vaccinations and was diagnosed with fleas, hookworms and heartworms. She was given Comfortis for the fleas, Pyran for the hookworms, and then ivermectin to start treating the microfilare of the heartworms with stronger treatments to come in the next few months. Behaviorally, she is an absolute darling.

For the record, I immediately started her on a raw meaty bone diet to give her the best possible food source. She eats no commercial dog foods, only chicken, beef, and lamb, raw and as whole as possible.

After reading your site, I prepared a warm saltwater solution and dabbed it on the affected eye area. This seemed to give her some relief and she is resting now without fussing over it.

I still would like your opinion on the matter, and her possible skin condition, to confirm that I am doing everything possible for my little rescue angel.

Thanks in advance,

Brandi

Comments for Dog Eye and Skin Irritations

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Nov 18, 2010
My Online Vet Response for Dog Eye and Skin Irritations
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman


Hi Brandi,
STOP the Ivermectin!! Collies, Border collies, Shelties and other related breeds with a white face and white feet, are very allergic to Ivermectin.

Give her 1mg/lb of Benadryl (i.e. if she weighs 25 lbs, she would need 25 mg of Benadryl) or she may need to have an intravenous injection of dexamethasone, a type of cortisone, which acts as a very strong anti-inflammatory.

She can also take the homeopathic remedy Nux vomica 6c or 12c every hour for 3 hours, then every 8 hours, as needed for an allergic reaction.

Rinsing her eyes with saline is ok, she may need to have an antibiotic/cortisone ointment in her eyes, and also make her wear an E-collar to prevent further trauma to her face. A few drops of olive oil into each eye will also help to moisturize her corneas.

She may need a skin scraping to rule out Demodex mites, if she continues to have hair loss around her face. But, from the photo and the amount of itching, I believe it is due to the Ivermectin.

You should seek out the help of a holistic veterinarian, to help sort out what is happening with Mattie now. To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click here:
find a holistic veterinarian in your area

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Related Pages:
- Dog Eye Problems,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Eye Problems Section,
- Dog Skin Conditions,
- Dog Itchy Skin,
- Dog Skin Rash,
- Dog Skin Allergies,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Skin Rashes, Marks, Spots, Lesions & Patches (including itchy skin and mange) Section.
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Hair Loss Section

Dec 02, 2014
Comfortis and Ivermectin?
by: Anonymous

For those with other breeds, Comfortis (spinosad) and ivermectin should not be given together.

Dec 03, 2014
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Eye and Skin Irritations
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

December 3, 2014

Dear Anonymous,
Yes, there are reports of toxicities that have occurred combining Comfortis flea product with the Ivermectin heartworm preventive. Although, more reports seem to involve the 'off label' use of higher doses of ivermectin used for Demodex mange.

As a holistic veterinarian, I try to use much safer flea control products, and avoid Ivermectin in the Collie, Border Collies and Sheltie breeds.

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman


P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!


DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Click here to add your own comments

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