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Dog Bladder Stones Treatment & Nutrition

by Dawn
(New York, USA)

My shih tzu is on a special low protein diet for ammonium phosphate dog bladder stones she had a year or two ago, and I'd like to transition her to a more holistic and organic diet. I'm willing to make it myself, if there's no simpler option.

First, what is your experience with bladder stones in dogs and how have you treated them?

Regarding my dog's diet, I know there are grain-free prepared foods, but I'm not sure if I should worry about her getting too much protein or not (if I add meat). Maybe grains were the problem, and not the protein?

There's a lot of conflicting nutritional info out there, for people and pets!!!

Thanks,

Dawn

Comments for Dog Bladder Stones Treatment & Nutrition

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Sep 28, 2011
My Online Vet Response for Dog Bladder Stones Treatment & Nutrition
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Dawn,

In answer to your question on what is the best treatment for 'triple phosphate' crystals/stones in the urinary bladder, it depends on the size of the stones. For stones that are 2" or more in diameter, it may best to have them surgically removed. Trying to dissolve them may take 6 months to one year, and she would be in moderate discomfort for that length of time.

On the other hand, if the stones are smaller than one inch in diameter, then diet is the best option along with treating her holistically to dissolve the stones and prevent a recurrence.

To dissolve this type of dog bladder stone, the urine must be maintained at a pH of 6-6.5 (in the acid range). It is not necessarily important to have her on a low protein diet to create an acid urine. But a grain-free diet would be best, since grains will tend to produce a more alkaline urine, pH 8-8.5.

The diet that will help her produce an acid urine is a meat-based diet. It must be balanced for the proper ratio of calcium to phosphorus. Too much phosphorus will add to the stone size, since they are composed of phosphorus, magnesium, and ammonium.

Therefore, just adding meat to the diet will not be the answer, since meat by itself is very high in phosphorus. The meat must contain bone (bone is high in calcium). Feeding a raw diet that is already balanced with the correct ration of calcium to phosphorus would be ideal.

Solid Gold PH Test Strips 50 Count for Dogs and Cats

The way to make sure that the diet you have chosen for her is working, it is easy to use Litmus paper from a pool supply store (cheap) or dog urine pH test strips (more expensive), and when she goes outside to urinate, hold the strip of the paper in her stream of urine.

The paper will change color according to the pH. If her urine is consistently alkaline, you may need to adjust her diet even more with the addition of 1/4 tsp of apple cider vinegar into each meal.

TO BE CONTINUED IN PART TWO

Sep 28, 2011
My Online Vet Response for Dog Bladder Stones Treatment & Nutrition PART TWO
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Dawn,
Here is the continuation of my response:

Shih tzus can be picky eaters, so you may need to look for a good quality canned dog food that she likes, and then add a small amount of the raw diet into it, and gradually transition her.

If you are in the New York area, a holistic veterinarian that I would recommend is Dr. Stacey Hershman.

If her clinic is too far away, you can try the Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy, to find a holistic veterinarian closer to you.

Or you can click here for a broader holistic vet search.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Related Pages:
- Dog Urination Problems & Dog Incontinence Products,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Urination Problems Section

Feb 20, 2012
Calcium Oxalate bladder stones
by: Anonymous

Is there any options for helping my small dog with these type of stones? He has already had 1 surgery to remove them, but I know they are prone to coming back. He is on a vet prescribed diet, but I am sure there is more I can do for him.

Thanks!
Jill

Feb 21, 2012
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Bladder Stones Treatment & Nutrition
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Jill,
Thanks for your question.

I'm happy to help, but we only accept new questions from subscribers (the original question above was from a subscriber).
Please click here to sign up and submit your question and photos. I'll then get back to you right away at the bottom of your newly created web page.
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Jun 22, 2012
We dissolved our dogs struvite bladder stones in 10 weeks
by: Richard Call

I thought your response to a question about dissolving struvite bladder stones was excellent. Please click here to see how we just dissolved our 2+ female cockachon's stones in 10 weeks (link will open in a new window).

What is your opinion, and would you like more detailed information, including before/after x-rays?

Jun 23, 2012
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Bladder Stones Treatment & Nutrition
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Richard,
Wow, what an exchange between yourself and the 'resident' veterinarian on the 'Askville' forum!

You wrote,
"Animals need all the competent, compassionate veterinarians that the profession can produce. However, it would be in a dog's best interest for vets to be open to anecdotal evidence, rather than being swayed by dog food companies that sell their special dietary products."

Well said!

For myself, as a veterinarian with 32 years of experience, almost 20 years being holistic, I have used NON surgical treatment for bladder stones, tumors, and other diseases that conventional medicine advises should be corrected by surgery. If I limited myself to practice ONLY what I learned in veterinary school, I would NEVER have believed this possible. And I would not have helped as many dogs or cats as I have by 'expanding' my education to include, homeopathy and acupuncture, Bach Flower essences, and nutritional supplements.

I commend you on taking it on yourself, to help your dog dissolve her bladder stones the 'natural' way. And in so doing, you have made her a much healthier dog, with a BETTER diet, which will prevent her from developing new stones. Surgery may be a 'quick' cure, but is very stressful for the patient, (not to mention risks of anesthesia,etc.) and if the same diet is continued, then the same stones will re-appear. Other factors play a part in formation of stones, besides diet, breed disposition and vaccinations, also are important.

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us
by clicking the like button at the top of the left
margin
. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.







Feb 06, 2013
bladder stones
by: Sylvia

I am reading a lot of information about bladder stones and how changing diet helps but none of then tell exactly what the diet is just natural food is not enough, I need to know is it chicken, meat if so what kind of meat is best? lamb,veal or beef, I eat organic also feed my 7 year old female shi-tzu chicken and vegetables, is that good or bad? is there something else I need to feed her? she had surgery to remove her stones when I resqued her at the age of 1, I do worry it may happen again, what cad I feed her to prevent that from happening again? I am open for suggestions.

Feb 07, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Bladder Stones Treatment & Nutrition
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Sylvi,
Thanks for your question. I'm happy to help, but we only accept new questions from subscribers (the original question above was from a subscriber).
Please click here to sign up and submit your question and photos. I'll then get back to you right away at the bottom of your newly created web page.
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Jul 17, 2014
Distilled Water NEW
by: Gee

About 10 yrs ago when our Bichon, Maggie, developed struvite bladder stones for the second time (requiring a second surgery), I researched the topic on the internet. A couple of sites recommended giving your dog only distilled water, which makes sense because the minerals have been removed from the water. We immediately changed Maggie's water source and she never had another problem. Since then we've only given our other Bichons distilled water too. So far, so good. Hope this helps.

Jul 18, 2014
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Bladder Stones Treatment & Nutrition NEW
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

July 17, 2014

Hi Gee,
That is a good suggestion, and one that I will sometimes advise, using either Spring Water, or purified water rather than tap water.

Thank you for posting!

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area . Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org .

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman


P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin . Thank you!


DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.


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