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Dog Belly Rash Spread to Back

by Nyna
(New York City!!!)

belly area. Are redder than in these pics

belly area. Are redder than in these pics

belly area. Are redder than in these pics
belly area. Are redder than in these pics
belly area. Are redder than in these pics
the area where I was scratching him where there is now a tiny bit of hair loss.

Our dog has what we thought in the beginning was heat rash, which was about a month ago. His fur is dark brown and black. The "rash" was mainly on his belly where there is mostly no fur.


I noticed red patches, so I Googled heat rash in dogs and found that putting aloe vera on the area would help, but then came a couple tiny puss filled bumps. And just now I was giving him a big scratching session, where I scratch his back, because he likes it and I felt a bunch of flat bumps and took a look and now the redness and flaky skin bumps are on the back end of his back in an area approx. 2 inches in diameter.

Then I noticed that my scratching him left a bit a of hair loss. Not sure about this part being related, because he's a huge shedder! He has plenty of energy, has an appetite, drinks plenty of water, and sleeps well.

He has been licking the area on his belly and I think it might be contributing to it's worsening. He doesn't lick it a lot, and doesn't seem to be bothered by it otherwise. I just don't want it to spread, get worse and of course...we want our cute furry boy to be well : )

One more thing...When I was giving him scratches, I irritated the area and it kinda smells now. After seeing this area, I felt around, but didn't seem to find anywhere else, but also his fur is so dark that I think just aside from checking every inch of him, I don't think I would be able to know if there are other areas.

Like I said, I just happened to come across the area on his back because I was scratching him. I looked up on a vet's site and it had a pic of what looks the same as the pics I have sent you of my dogs belly. They called it:

Canine Bacterial Skin Infection and Dog Skin Pimples

Pyoderma (skin pustules): caused by a bacterial skin infection.

Brighten is a 3 year old rescue and is mostly Australian Shepard and likely a bit of Burmese Mountain Dog from his size and other markings. He weighs about 80-90 lbs. Last Wii Fit weigh-in was 84 lbs, but that was the last time I could lift him! He's a BIG boy! Hee!

I am looking for an inexpensive solution as in this moment, we are notable to afford much, but he is such a dear family member and love him so! His name says it all and was the name that was given to him at the ASPCA...He truly Brightens up your day! He loves all people and all dogs! Really!

Thank you for your time!

I Hope All Is Well In Your World : )

Nyna

NOW! If you could help me with the fact that Brighten is a ball stealer when in the park with other dogs..well then!...THAT would be a miracle : ) Bwahahahaha!

Comments for Dog Belly Rash Spread to Back

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Aug 18, 2014
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Belly Rash Spread to Back
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

August 18, 2014

Hi Nyna,
You diagnosed it yourself. All of these are correct! (Actually, they are all the same thing).
Canine Bacterial Skin Infection and Dog Skin Pimples

Pyoderma (skin pustules): caused by a bacterial skin infection.

The best way to get Brighten well, is to transition him to a RAW diet. This is certainly NOT an inexpensive solution considering how big he is, but it is the healthiest!! You can compromise by feeding him a combination of dry, canned and raw.

Therefore, each meal is 1/3 DRY, 1/3 canned, (the canned and dry can be the same brand), and 1/3 raw. See our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options, http://www.organic-pet-digest.com/10-best-dog-food-options.html. And consider some of these brands, BRAVO!, Primal, Nature's Variety, etc.

Make sure you are feeding him adequate calories. For a dog that weighs 80-90 lbs, he will need 1,200 to 1,300 calories per day. It is best to divide it into two meals. So, each meal should provide 600-650 calories.

Next, you will need to bathe him one time per week for the next 3-6 weeks, with a Baby Shampoo. This removes surface bacteria.

Before the shampoo, massage coconut oil into his back area, where he has all of the dandruff, and dry skin. Let this stay on him and soak into his skin for 2-3 HOURS. If he is still greasy, you may need to use Dawn dish detergent to get all of the oil off of him. Rinse, then bathe with the Baby shampoo. If he is not greasy, just bathe with the Baby shampoo.

In my experience, dogs that are prone to this skin condition, have had some 'stress' to their immune system, such as a vaccination, or an emotional upset. Or if they have any kind of allergy, (flea, food, or inhaled allergy, such as to pollen or grasses.) Or if they have just had a DRY dog food diet their whole life.

I am not sure when you adopted him, but being in the shelter is a HUGE stress, and of course, they give vaccinations before they are adopted. (double whammy!)

To boost his immune system, try Canine Whole Body Support by Standard Process, and/or one of these:

1. Missing Link Canine Formula
2. Immuplex from Standard Process
3. OrthoMolecular Specialties, Mega C Powder

If he is due for any vaccines, DO NOT vaccinate him at this time. Find a holistic veterinarian to write an exemption form. To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

He may also need a homeopathic remedy, dietary supplements, and/or omega 3 fish oils, but start with all of the above first.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

(P.S.--you are on your own trying to stop him from stealing balls!)

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.





Aug 19, 2014
Thank you sooo much Dr.Tillman! For your DX & RX!
by: Nyna

Hee! Thank you for your response to our Brightens skin condition...We're on it with what you suggest we do! And will let you know what the outcome is : ) Though I'm sure it will be a great one anyway!

Brighten is sooo smart and it's funny that, I' m a vegetarian and we were eating a big ol' salad for lunch and even when I was preparing it, he kept bugging me for some of the carrots and cucumber, which I gave to him and then we were eating and he still wanted more! So, I think he was telling me you were gonna suggest the raw aspect of his diet! He actually love bananas, oranges more than meat! Like he literally drools over bananas! But not the meat! Though I cook fresh ground turkey by boiling it with nothing added.

Anyhoo!...Thank you again...I'll keep you posted...

I Hope All Is Well In Your World : )

Nyna

Aug 19, 2014
My Online Vet Response for: Dog Belly Rash Spread to Back
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

August 19, 2014

Hi Nyna,
Please do not feed Brighten oranges, (or any other citrus fruits), tomatoes, onions or grapes. While dogs *can* be vegetarian, they were not intended to be that way naturally. Their stomach acid is 10 times higher than a human, to enable them to eat a carnivorous diet of raw bone, meat, cartilage, etc.

In my opinion, dogs should have some meat in their diet, and if Brighten's skin does not clear up completely, and/or he continues to have relapses, you will need to transition him to meat.

Cats are 'obligate' carnivores and cannot survive on a vegetarian diet.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



Aug 19, 2014
Okee dohkee!
by: Nyna

I will eliminate the oranges, though it is only a piece every now and again : ) And up until your suggestion of adding raw food to his diet, I give him half and half of dry food and the ground turkey, twice a day...

Thankee! Thankee!

Nyna

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