SpotOnTM Case Study #X that Includes Your Dog’s Symptom(s)Case Study #X

Ask Our Vets < Back to Search Results< Back

Crusty Fast-Growing Mole-Like Growth on Dog's Leg

by Charmaine
(Zabat)




There is a growth on my dog's leg that I noticed on 5/24. The growth is hard and the top is crusty, and the sides are reddish/pink. It's raised up from the skin and top part has something that looks like an eye (think about pimple) and today it's kind of flaky.


When you look at the side, it's like I can almost take it off. I took two pictures, one shows the top view, one of the side view.

One thing I did notice is that when he climbs the stairs, he stops on the right paw to pull him up (the growth is on the left leg).

The day before I noticed the growth he was at the vet getting the following shots:
Vaccine - Canine Bordetella
Tonometry
Pyrantel Pamoate 50 mg/ml

It started out half the size and I took him to the vet a week after 5/24 and I was told to really find out for sure we need to take a sample and that cost $80. The other option was to have the whole mass removed and I was planning on doing that by November when he is due for his dental cleaning.

I am not sure about this now since I have read some issues that for some growths like this if you remove, more might come.

Nothing has changed behavior wise and if I press the area he doesn't even react. I think he reacts more to me twisting his leg around so I can see the growth.

Is it a good idea to have this thing removed?

It's not really affecting him and my only worry is that whether it's cancerous or not. So far I don't think it really bothers him.

Comments for Crusty Fast-Growing Mole-Like Growth on Dog's Leg

Click here to add your own comments

Jun 14, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Crusty Fast-Growing Mole-Like Growth on Dog's Leg
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Charmaine,
From the photos you submitted, this does not look like a malignant growth. You did not give the age of your dog, since dogs older than 7-8 years seem to be more susceptible to warts appearing. These are due to vaccinations, and the more vaccines given to your dog the more warts/growths/tumors etc he will form. See our page on Dog Warts.

Unfortunately, you just had vaccinations given to your dog.

Instead of surgically removing this wart, try this:
1. - 1X potency.

Apply ointment to wart one time daily for the next 3-6 weeks. Apply it just before he is going to eat, this way it will give him a distraction so he will not lick off the ointment immediately.

2. Consider an improvement in his diet. NO DRY FOOD. See our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options and consider a RAW diet for your dog. Make a gradual change to the raw diet over the next 3-6 weeks.

3. NO MORE VACCINATIONS. Seek the help of a holistic veterinarian to write an exemption form to avoid future vaccinations. Also, to treat your dog for any eye problems. (You mentioned you had the intra-ocular pressure checked at your visit.) As a *holistic* veterinarian, it is NOT just the wart that will be treated, the WHOLE patient will be treated.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Hopefully, this wart will shrink and disappear, and by treating holistically, he will be healthier overall!

If the wart is taking a longer time to respond to treatment, your dog may need some oral homeopathic remedies to treat 'vaccinosis' and also some immune support supplements.

1. Missing Link Canine Formula
2. Immuplex from Standard Process
3. OrthoMolecular Specialties, Mega C Powder

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Related Pages:
- Dog Warts
- Dog Skin Conditions
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Warts, Cysts and Strange Growths Section

Sep 13, 2015
Just a big, ol' wart NEW
by: Anonymous

Hi,

Same thing happened to my dog. He suddenly developed this big, brown, crusty "beauty wart" on his face.

A dog-person looked at it and said it was a wart. Most likely, caused by over-vaccination. For aesthetic reasons, you might want to have it removed but, it's expensive.

If you just leave it and apply topical stuff like, vitamin E, Apple Cider Vinegar and maybe lavender oil (look into each) a few times a day, the thing will just...fall off his face in 3-6 months.

Careful about your vet... Vets don't care about you or your pet. They are extremely greedy and unscrupulous.

Cheers,
Marsha

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Ask a Vet Online via My Online Vet (SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED FOR NEW QUESTIONS).

This is the end of SpotOnTM Case Study #X for Your Symptom(s).End of Case Study #X

Ask Our Vets < Back to Search Results< Back

Want to ask our veterinarians a question but haven't subscribed to My Online Vet? Click here to learn how or click here to go back to the Ask a Vet Online Library of questions.

Want monthly "News You Can Use" and important Organic Pet Digest new content updates?  Click here to sign up for our FREE Dog Care Monthly newsletter.


Do you believe in holistic pet care?  If so, please tell your friends about us with a Facebook like, Google +1 or via Twitter, Pinterest, email or good old fashioned word of mouth. Thank you for supporting our efforts!

For additional research, search for your topic...



Disclaimers: The information contained in this web site is provided for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as nor should be relied upon as medical advice. Rather, it is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a pet owner/site visitor and his/her local veterinarian(s). Before you use any of the information provided in the site, you should seek the advice of a qualified professional.

In the spirit of full disclosure, we wanted to let you know that we proudly support this website through advertising and affiliate marketing. In other words, when you click on a link that takes you outside of this website, we often earn a small commission. These small commissions allow us to keep the site up and running and to continue offering it completely free of charge to you. Rest assured that all content, recommendations and advice are created before, and are independent of, any sponsorship or affiliate relationship. Click here for more info.