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Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth / muzzle

by Terri
(North Carolina, USA)


Just over a year ago my dog (a 70 lb lab/Shepard/chow/pit, etc. mix) began suffering from a terrible infection on the outside of his lower mouth (both sides). It would scab over and bleed - causing him pain, itching & suffering. The more the infection spreads, the bigger the scabs become and the more he bleeds. The area becomes very raw.

Initially, I would put warm compresses on it for as long as he would allow (30 seconds on a good day), but that did not work. The infection spread around the lower portion of his muzzle area, and he would scratch the scabs off (which included the fur attached to them). He has a black mouth, so it is difficult for the vets to see it (he is not a cooperative dog), and it seems they tend to minimize the severity of it.

I brought him to 2 vets over the past year, and he has been on several rounds of Cephalexin(?) for various lengths of time (once for 2 months); however, the infection would come back almost as soon as he finished the course of antibiotic. I have also used an antiseptic wipe that he barely tolerates (and only does because I insisted, but that seems cruel).

One vet said he suffered from a condition (cannot recall or pronounce the name) that is common to Shepards and that he may have to be on antibiotics for his entire life (he is now 12 1/2 years old) and/or that a 'scraping' would have to be performed. The other vet said that the particular bacteria involved may become immune to the antibiotic and suggested I try an injection (again, cannot recall name) that I would have to administer.

All I know is that my dog is suffering, I do not know what is wrong with him, and I cannot get a clear answer as to how to at least manage (if not cure) this constantly recurring infection.

I feed him twice a day in a glass bowl. His food consists of about 1/4 cup good quality dry food mixed with cooked chicken, green beans and two balls of a mixture I made up for him: (canned salmon (and sometimes tuna), ground flax, carrots and whatever other vegetable I may have (zuccini, broccoli, green beans, sweet potatoes..), oatmeal, barley and (sometimes) rice. I use use a food processor and then scoop little balls and bake them until firm - then refrigerate what I'll use over a few days and freeze the rest to use as needed.

I do give him rawhide on occasion, and I generally give him half a 'Milk Bone' dog biscuit after his walks (at least 3 a day). I also give him the yolk from my hard boiled eggs in the morning - though I just read on your site that this may cause an allergic reaction in dogs (please advise on this).



In any event, I am hoping for a holistic solution to my dog's torment. Jack has always been a happy dog; however, he has not been this past year. I should also note that this began just before I had to euthanize his Mom last June when she became very, very ill. We both still miss her terribly.

Also, within 2 weeks of me having to euthanize Belle, Jack had to have emergency surgery for an obstruction after he ate aluminum foil someone cooked with & neglected to keep out of his reach. He had a splenectomy at the same time when the operating vet found a nodule during the surgery (though he had the mouth infection prior to that).

Jack also is prone to skin tags and has about 5. One is on his eyelid. He developed those over the past few years, but they do not seem to bother him. He also hates to be brushed (despises it) and will always try to get away from 'the brush'.

He sheds profusely (he always has), and lately I have noticed clumps of fur that I can just pick off him. I do not see any 'hot spots' or other such areas on his body, however. He does need a dental cleaning, but, at the moment, affordability is an issue.

Overall my concern is the infection around the outside of his lower mouth that he continues to suffer from. I do not want to keep him on antibiotics (beyond the cost factor) if that will only serve to make the bacteria become resistant to it. I would obviously prefer to find the cause of the infection and eliminate it in holistic manner.

I've uploaded a photo of Jack (above), but I cannot get a good picture of the infected area. First, he will not cooperate and, second, where it is just now beginning to return, it is not clearly visible (I can feel it before I can see it). The specific location is outside his lower 'lips' below the canines. It starts there and spreads quickly to the corners of his mouth and below - it then becomes raw and scabby with black scabs.

I am so thankful for this opportunity. I have spent countless hours on the Internet trying to find some information on this, but I have not been able to find much of anything at all.

Comments for Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth / muzzle

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Jul 21, 2011
My Online Vet Response for Chronic Infections on both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Terri,

You wrote:
"The specific location is outside his lower 'lips' below the canines. It starts there and spreads quickly to the corners of his mouth and below"

The condition to which you are referring, with Jack, is called LIP FOLD DERMATITIS. Basically it is due to poor dog dental condition combined with excessive lip folds in this area, where saliva may drain from the mouth, becoming trapped between the skin folds, harboring yeast and secondary bacteria that result in the scabs that spread below his mouth.

You are correct in connecting the events that would have caused him stress (his mother was euthanized), which would then decrease his immune system. Removing his spleen would definitely be a HUGE stress to his immune system, and noting the skin tags, his shedding and loss of hair in clumps, are all signs of a poor immune system.

Ok, here are my suggestions:

1. He does need a teeth cleaning. But you might try to start with some better tartar control treats. NO MORE RAWHIDES, and NO MORE MILK BONES.

If he has some yeast causing the problem you need to minimize carbohydrates or sugars in his diet. That is what yeast thrives on. There are many tartar control treats available. But Jack needs to like them and chew on them, and to be able to digest them ok, and have a normal stool. AND they need to work to CLEAN his teeth!!

2. To help get rid of the yeast, add apple cider vinegar to his food two times daily, about 1/2 to 1 tsp. Ideally, it would also be good to apply it to the areas on Jack's lip fold areas, where the scabs are located. But since he is SO sensitive about that, then just put it into his food.

3. Use RAW chicken not cooked (The only raw meats to AVOID would be fish and pork.) Raw meats will help improve Jack's immune system, help his skin heal, and help give him a healthier hair coat.

4. Instead of flax, use Omega 3 fish oil for dogs. Add 500mg to 1,000 mg two times daily to his food.

TO BE CONTINUED IN PART TWO

Jul 21, 2011
My Online Vet Repsonse for Chronic Infections on both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle PART TWO
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Terri,
Here is Part Two with the continuation of my answer:

5. Decrease the grains in the diet, since they are a big source of carbohydrates.

6. All of the vegetables you are using are great.

7. It would be healthier to use the entire egg, not just the yolk. Add in one cooked whole egg, to his food, one to two times per week. He should be able to tolerate that.

8. He needs to have acidophilus added to his food two times daily (This will replace the beneficial bacteria in his GI Tract that was lost when he had antibiotics.)

9. More specific immune supplements include:
Immuplex from Standard Process. Give him one capsule opened and sprinkled onto his food two times daily) and OrthoMolecular Specialties, Mega C Powder

10. NO MORE VACCINATIONS. Find a holistic veterinarian to write an exemption form, if he is due for any shots. Also, a holistic veterinarian may have some other suggestions, homeopathic remedies, etc. more specific to Jack's constitution, since he will be able to see Jack in 'person.'

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click here:
find a holistic veterinarian in your area

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Jul 21, 2011
Thank You!
by: Terri

I ended my initial post by expressing my gratitude for this site, and I want to begin this one by reiterating my appreciation. Truly. Somehow I knew that if I did not find the underlying 'holistic' reason for Jack's issues soon, I would be losing him too.

I already applied the Apple Cider vinegar to the area, and, surprisingly, Jack didn't protest at all. I knew that this was good for humans (and I have used it myself over the years), but I had no idea it would be as beneficial to my dogs. I wish I knew this for Belle (I think her last immunization is what made her so ill that I ultimately had to euthanize her to end her terrible suffering....still makes me cry thinking about my sweet girl).

I will no longer give Jack the rawhide and, until I can replace them with the tartar control treats you suggest, I will reduce his 'after walk treats' to a nibble (he will poke me with his paw until I give him his 'treat'). I have ordered the other products online and look forward to helping him return to good health.

I will replace the cooked chicken with raw chicken. However, where I am reducing the grains, I will have to increase the amount of chicken. I make every effort to only buy chicken (I am a vegetarian) that has been treated humanely, but this is more costly. Therefore, are you aware of any company/farm where I can buy humanely raised and slaughtered chicken in greater portions?

And beef is okay to feed him raw as well? Is hamburger or steak mixed in with his food okay just to give him a variation - or should I stick with the chicken only?

Once again, thank you from the bottom of my heart. I wish I found this site a year ago.

Terri

Jul 22, 2011
My Online Vet Response for Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Terri,

You are very welcome. As for a location for humanely raised chickens, I am not familiar with the North Carolina area. Perhaps you could search online? But you do not have to feed ONLY raw chicken, it would be perfectly ok to feed raw beef, turkey, or lamb if you wished.

DO NOT feed him any RAW PORK or RAW FISH.

And when you are decreasing the grains in the diet, you will increase the protein, this is very important to help him heal and to improve his immune system. You can also increase the vegetables in his diet, as the grain portion is decreased.

To also aid in decreasing any stresses in the environment, such as fly biting problems, fleas or ticks, you should use a more natural products. One such product is called Wondercide, made from cedar oil.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Related Pages:
- Dog Dental Hygiene & Mouth/Gum/Teeth Problems,
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Mouth, Teeth & Gums Section

Aug 02, 2011
Humanely Raised Chickens
by: Administrator

Hi Terri,

I did some searching and was able to find the following resource regarding humanely raised chickens in North Carolina: Eatwild

Just click on the map at the top or the link that says "Eatwild North Carolina map" to find a location near you.

Hope that helps!

Jeff

P.S. We're so happy to hear that our site and Dr. Tillman's advice has been useful. If you use Facebook, would you mind spreading the word by "liking" us by clicking the Like button at the top of the left margin? Thanks!!

Jan 30, 2012
possibly Lupus
by: Christy Patterson

Did your vet test him for Lupus?

Jan 30, 2012
My Online Vet Response for: Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Christy,

Thank you for your suggestion. Lupus is one of the autoimmune diseases that will affect the muco-cutaneous junctions, especially around the lips.

Regarding your comment on having Jack tested for Lupus, (foliaceous or vulgaris), even if the diagnosis came back positive, I would still treat Jack for his underlying immune deficiency. Treating the patient for the symptoms he is exhibiting, NOT by the disease name, is what holistic practitioners are doing. Of course, if Jack is not responding to 'superficial' diet changes, and the additions of supplements, then I would suggest that Terri seek the help of a holistic veterinarian.

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us
by clicking the like button at the top of the left
margin
. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.







Feb 25, 2012
LIP FOLD DERMATITIS
by: Cheryl

Hi,
THANK YOU SO MUCH for posting this!! I have a yellow lab mix with the SAME problem. Our vet told us to just "keep at it, try to keep ahead of it" by cleaning with peroxide, warm salt water, etc. He never said whether diet, or stress (she gets bad separation anxiety), could be an issue. I am going to try the apple cider, change her dry dog food to a better, meat-based one and give raw chicken, lamb, beef or turkey once in a while, along with possibly giving a brewer's yeast supplement. She already takes PhyCox supplement. Will also quit giving Milk Bones. Again, THANK YOU for your help!

Feb 26, 2012
My Online Vet Response for: Chronic infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Cheryl,
Glad you found our site, and hopefully the recommendations will also help your dog. Although, if your dog is not responding as expected, then seeking the help of a holistic veterinarian would certainly be a prudent course of action!

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us
by clicking the like button at the top of the left
margin
. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.







Feb 05, 2013
Beagle with lip fold dermatitis
by: Britni

Our 3 year old beagle was diagnosed with lip fold dermatitis about 2 years ago from our holistic vet. She had us clean his mouth with a 50/50 solution of raw acv and water and then put jojoba oil or almond oil with lavender or tea tree oil on it. We did this twice a day for 2 weeks then once a day for a month, now we do it once a week. It looks great and no more smell. We feed him sojos and add raw turkey or chicken to it. We also use solid gold seameal which really seemed to help.

Feb 06, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Britni,
Thank you so much for your comments. Excellent suggestion to treat Lip fold dermatitis!

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us
by clicking the like button at the top of the left
margin
. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



Feb 06, 2013
Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth / muzzle
by: Cheryl

I have gone to grain free food, but still comes back; my vet told me that there is no real "cure" for it, just manageability. I use Dawn dish soap to clean it off really well, dry if off and just keep after it. Her teeth are o.k., according to out vet; I would like to get them cleaned, but at $450 -$500, just can't afford it right now. I still have to look into a holistic vet. Thanks for being here for all of us!

Feb 23, 2013
Lip-fold dermatitis
by: CHERYL Cobern

Hi, Wanted to share this with you all....My dog is still experiencing this problem. Medication helps, but it keeps coming back and I don't want to keep putting her on anti-biotics and prednisone. The other products I was using, she HATED and I had trouble getting her to stay still. So, today, 2/23/13, I decided to try something different. AS those of you, who have dogs with this problem know, it can get really "cakey" and nasty. Cleaning it is/can be as much of a problem as the problem itself. Today, I tried cleaning it with coconut oil... it's very easy to use and my dog loves the taste, therefore, she didn't back off or fight me. The coconut oil cleaned it really well (put some on your finger, rub it in and the "scabs" come off pretty much by themselves) and very easily. When I got it all off, I rubbed honey (naturally anti-biotic, anti-viral, anti-fungal) into/onto it. I just checked her and it is not seeping; it is a bit "moist" from the oil and honey and I am dabbing it every once-in-awhile. I will try to remember to keep you updated as to how it progresses and what else, if anything, I need to do with it.

Feb 25, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Chronic Infections on both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Cheryl,
Thank you for posting your experience in treating lip fold dermatitis. As you mentioned, treatment can be difficult if the patient is not cooperating! It sounds like you hit on a great solution with the coconut oil for your dog. It is comfortable for him and easy for you to apply!

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us
by clicking the like button at the top of the left
margin
. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the picture you submitted. The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.



Mar 18, 2013
crusty rash around dogs mouth
by: rita

Hi terri-
My pom has the same issue with the black crusty rash-It is not from skin folds as his mouth area is very tight--He got it last year so I am wondering if it is allergies-I took him to vet last year and they put him on 2 different meds but it took almost 2 months to cure. I am now using peroxide and applying it with a q tip to the area. He has small mouth--It seems to be getting better and he is not itching--I am going to try the apple cider v inegar also.
Good luck

Mar 19, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Rita,
If you have a question, I'm happy to help, but we only accept new questions from subscribers (the original question above was from a subscriber).
Please click here to sign up and submit your question and photos.

I'll then get back to you right away at the bottom of your newly created web page.

Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Mar 27, 2013
Update
by: Anonymous

Cheryl, Rita and Dr. Carol,

I haven't been on the site for a while, so I was not aware of the subsequent posts.

Jack's condition cleared up in October 2011....finally, after over a year of suffering and several (expensive) vet visits & antibiotics. The last vet I went to informed me that the reason the antibiotics did not work long-term was because he had an underlying fungal infection as well... (fungal and bacterial infections). She wanted to treat him for both.

Well, by this time I had moved back to the New England coast, and I recalled something my father told me as a kid: Basically, if you have a wound to heal, go to the ocean. So, I began taking Jack to the beach again. Although he is a lab mix, he's not so fond of water; so I had to throw in a ball or stick far enough in where he had to reach for it to get his mouth in the water.

Within a month, the infection was gone. It has not come back.

Although I always fed him a high-quality corn-free kibble mixed with some organic wet and/or meat, I also stopped giving him the 'Milk Bones' - or any 'treat' with gluten. Gluten/wheat is as bad for animals as it is for people. (It's even in canned cat food!)

Also, as an aside, with regard to sea water, I am highly allergic to poison ivy. I always had to go the dr. for prednisone as it would just continue to spread all over (tortureous!). Since I did not want to use steriods, I found that sea water also helped that (as does jewel weed).

I realize not everyone lives by the coast, but I thought I would throw that out there to anyone who does - or knows anyone who does who would be willing to mail it out.

My best to all of you,
Terri

P.S. Does anyone know a holistic treatment for hyperthyroidism in cats - or what causes it? I have had two cats suffer from it suddenly in less than a year's time. Thank you.

Mar 27, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exerior lower mouth/muzzle
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Terri,
Thank you for the update on Jack, and I am glad he is doing well now. Yes, saltwater is good for chronic skin infections. Hopefully, you also continued the raw meat in his diet.

As for hyperthyroidism in cats, here is the 'official' report from Cornell.

It is a disease that started to show up in the early 1980's. It has been linked to feeding foods high in iodine, foods that come in cans with pop-tops lids, and over vaccination, (that is the time that Feline Leukemia vaccine was started). Yes, it can be treated with homeopathic remedies, but it is a difficult disease to control since it is hard to treat from the beginning. Usually cats have had it for several months to a year, before the owner even notices.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.


Jan 24, 2014
My dog also has scabs around mouth NEW
by: Jayne

I finally just brought him to a dog dermatologist today because i wasn't comfortable that prednisone was the only thing that mad scabs go away. Too many risks in using that forever. Besides, it was getting worse and spread to his eyes. Well, it turns out he has mites! So doctor gave him an anti-mite med and an antibiotic to cure the infection the mites gave him. they tested the scabs and hair they scraped off the poor dog. Feel terrible that i waited this long for testing and wonder if others shouldn't try this if holistic treatments or other meds aren't working. They say it could be six weeks before we see results and 6 mos. before its cured tho.

Jan 24, 2014
My dog also has scabs around mouth NEW
by: Jayne

I finally just brought him to a dog dermatologist today because i wasn't comfortable that prednisone was the only thing that mad scabs go away. Too many risks in using that forever. Besides, it was getting worse and spread to his eyes. Well, it turns out he has mites! So doctor gave him an anti-mite med and an antibiotic to cure the infection the mites gave him. they tested the scabs and hair they scraped off the poor dog. Feel terrible that i waited this long for testing and wonder if others shouldn't try this if holistic treatments or other meds aren't working. They say it could be six weeks before we see results and 6 mos. before its cured tho.

Jan 24, 2014
My dog also has scabs around mouth NEW
by: Jayne

I finally just brought him to a dog dermatologist today because i wasn't comfortable that prednisone was the only thing that mad scabs go away. Too many risks in using that forever. Besides, it was getting worse and spread to his eyes. Well, it turns out he has mites! So doctor gave him an anti-mite med and an antibiotic to cure the infection the mites gave him. they tested the scabs and hair they scraped off the poor dog. Feel terrible that i waited this long for testing and wonder if others shouldn't try this if holistic treatments or other meds aren't working. They say it could be six weeks before we see results and 6 mos. before its cured tho.

Jan 25, 2014
My Online Vet Response for: Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle NEW
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

January 25, 2014

Hi Jayne,

Thank you for posting your experiences with your own dog and finding the diagnosis of mange. That is unusual location for mange mites, but that is wonderful that you went to a dermatologist who did a skin scraping to get to the bottom of the problem!

To find a holistic veterinarian in your area click on the link below
Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

P.S. If you've found this service or our web site helpful, please "Like" us by clicking the like button at the top of the left margin. Thank you!

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.


Apr 24, 2014
My experience NEW
by: Cindy Dittfield

My vet, at a routine exam, mentioned that I needed to keep an eye on my dogs jowls below his canines. He's a boxer/husky mix (among other things I suppose).
We switched him to a dry no wheat food which he loves (Taste of the Wild) and limit his other treats, etc. A very healthy dog.
Just noticed the areas of concern were beginning to get a little gunky with hardened saliva (maybe?) and decided to give the apple vinegar a try to see if it'll help keep the areas dry and clean.
Not sure if this is going to work so far; however, Kevin didn't flinch and seems to actually like the flavor and scent of the vinegar.
Will post again with insights after we try this for a time.
Thank you
C.

May 03, 2014
My Online Vet Response for: Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle NEW
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

May 3, 2014

Hi Cindy,

Not sure if you were asking a question or not. I am happy to help, but we only accept new questions from subscribers (the original question above was from a subscriber).
Please click here to sign up and submit your question and photos. I'll then get back to you right away at the bottom of your newly created web page.
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Jul 22, 2014
On The Right Track NEW
by: LeeAnn Goodlin

I have a 6 year old black lab and she has this gross crusty stuff around her lower lips as well. My vet said it was due to poor dental hygiene - whatever. We do give her yogurt in her food once a day, suppose to help with ear infections, which has decreased them significantly. So should I or should I not continue with the yogurt? We do feed her an all meat, dry dog food and she gets 1 apple a day, but she also gets Milk Bones, but from what I have read I will stop that and replace with a different brand. From what I can tell on the posts, is to clean the area with apple cidar vinger and apply the coconut oil to help keep the area moist so it will give it time to heal. I have started rubbing her teeth down with a "dog toothpaste" and she lets me.
Please let me know if I am on the right track with this treatment plan.

THank You,

Jul 22, 2014
My Online Vet Response For: Chronic Infections on the both sides of my dog's exterior lower mouth/muzzle NEW
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

July 22, 2014

Hi LeeAnn,
Yes, you are on the right track. Except do not feed all dry dog food. Check out our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options and consider a RAW diet for your dog! http://www.organic-pet-digest.com/10-best-dog-food-options.html

For a more in-depth response, I'm happy to help, but we only accept new questions from subscribers (the original question above was from a subscriber).
Please click here to sign up and submit your question and photos . I'll then get back to you right away at the bottom of your newly created web page.

Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Sep 18, 2014
Lip fold pyoderma and pyoderma NEW
by: J

He has lip fold pyoderma and pyoderma on his body which is why he is losing fur. Lip fold pyoderma can be caused by bacteria. My lap/pit mix currently has superficial pyoderma on his body and also a lip fold pyoderma on one side of his lower lip. Dogs who have a wrinkly lower lip are more prone to lip fold pyoderma because food/saliva/bacteria tends to get in between the folds and if you don't wipe/clean it after they eat/drink it can become infected. Also when you bathe your dog don't forget to get in between the folds. Pyoderma can also be a side effect to an untreated fungal infection. For example my dog developed fungal infection on his pads which were not treated so then he started getting raised bumps on his skin and when the inflammation went away he would lose a circle of hair where the bumps were.

Sep 18, 2014
Extended comment NEW
by: J

Also allergies can cause fungal infections over time if not taken care of. A dog can have food allergies, grass allergies etc. I live in an area where each season there is a different kind of weed (no grass grows in the back yard) that grows fast and can grow higher than 5ft if not cut regularly. These weeds would inflame his feet and skin even more at times. He initially started having problems with his paws when it would rain and he would come in from using the restroom. I learned the hard way that not drying paw pads after your dog comes in from a wet environment and not keeping the fur trimmed under the feet can lead to fungus on the paws and not treating that can lead to skin pyoderma. I never knew people got their dogs paws shaven until I started working in an animal clinic before I moved to working in an animal hospital. Coconut oil is a good and natural way to help with too much bacteria on a dog's lip fold and can also be used to make a natural dog toothpaste. Also ketochlor is a good shampoo to use to maintain the skin until everything is under control. Or you can use a generic antifungal/antibacterial shampoo. These shampoos do not cure the issue. They only keep the skin clean to prevent further irritation/infection. Finding out what your dog is allergic to and discontinuing it is the first step to recovery. Keeping skin and folds clean is another step. Then treatment for fungus or bacterial infection. I stoped feeding my dogs food containing wheat, corn, and soy. Got him a natural lamb and rice based food that also has some veggies and fruits, cleaned him with a good shampoo to control any excess skin b/f, forced family members to stop giving him table scraps and he recently got a teeth deep cleaning (some people offer anaesthesia free cleaning which is safer and could be looked into as an option for people with older dogs or dogs who don't respond well to anaesthesia) to remove plaque and bacteria build up in mouth. He currently is on a salmon pea and carrot dry food and has a liquid omega skin supplement. Oh and interestingly enough my dog use to get those original flavor millions treats when his skin was in the beginning stages of allergy skin issues. Not sure that is to blame as he was a rescue dog with a horrible skin and mouth odor due to poor hygiene and being fed alpo wet and dry food while in an animal clinic shelter for over a year before I adopted him. His skin issues and filthy teeth were in its beginning stages before became a member of the family, but the pyoderma etc were due to previously stated once he came to live with me.

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