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Bumps on dog's paw - toenail infection



MY DOG HAS DEVELOPED BUMPS ON HIS HIND LEFT PAW. THE FIRST ONE THAT STARTED GROWING IS RIGHT NEXT TO HIS TOE NAIL. THE TOE NAIL IS A LITTLE BLACK AS WELL. THE BUMP HAS TURNED BLACK AND BLEEDS.

HE DOES LIKE TO DIG. THERE ARE NOW MORE BUMPS AROUND THE TOP OF HIS PAW, BUT THEY ARE HIS SKIN COLOR. KIND OF GREY.

HE IS A SMOKE COLORED NEAPOLITAN. HE WAS GIVEN AMOX. FOR AN INFECTION FOR 15 DAYS 3000 MIL. HE DOES NOT LICK THE WOUND.

WE ARE STARTING TO HAVE FLIES AND I NEED TO KNOW WHAT TO DO ALSO TO KEEP THEM OFF OF THE WOUND.

Comments for Bumps on dog's paw - toenail infection

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Apr 20, 2011
My Online Vet Response for MY DOG'S PAW
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hello,
Your Neopolitan Mastiff has a nail bed infection. These can be very serious because the phalangeal (toe) bone, actually lies directly under the toenail causing injury to the nail, infection from bacteria or fungus, etc. can easily spread to the bone and cause osteomyelitis (bone infection). A more serious concern is that large breed dogs are more susceptible to canine tumors in the toe area.

To treat this problem conventionally, have a culture and sensitivity done from the drainage (blood from the bump) to identify the cause of the infection. Also take a sample of tissue from the bump to make sure it is not a cancer or tumor. A conventional vet may even want a food x-ray to ensure there has not been a 'spread' or metastasis to the adjoining bones in his foot.

If the problem is due to a bacteria, a sensitivity will determine the best antibiotic or anti-fungal to use. Treatment is usually done for at least 6 wks to completely clear it.

A holistic vet will perform all of the above, then use acupuncture, herbs and or homeopathy as a treatment plan. Also, provide immune support like:
1. Missing Link Canine Formula
2. Immuplex from Standard Process
3. OrthoMolecular Specialties, Mega C Powder

...and a healthy and wholesome diet. See our page on 10 Best Dog Food Options and consider adding in some raw meat (NO RAW PORK OR RAW FISH) to his diet.

I would advise NO MORE VACCINATIONS. A holistic vet would be able to write an exemption form, since he needs to be completely healthy before he gets any vaccination. And even then, if he gets a 'booster vaccination' I would be concerned that he may have a relapse, or one of his other toes may develop the same condition.

Wondercide is a natural, non-toxic insect repellent that would work well to keep flies away. It also repels fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, ants, roaches and other insects!

Click here to find a holistic vet in your area

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

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DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Related Page:
- Ask a Vet Online Library - Dog Paws, Toes & Dog Paw Pads Section

Dec 13, 2013
sores on dogs toes NEW
by: Anonymous

Have the veterinarian check for cancer on the toe. A sore that won't heal can be an indication. My dog had cancer of the toe.

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