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Best Dog Food Diet For Kidney Issues

by Roger
(Vancouver, WA)

My mom's dog was recently (about 2 months ago) diagnosed with elevated protein levels in her urine. Her vet said her kidneys were weakening and/or she was beginning to develop a kidney disease. I don't have the levels from the test. But further urine test apparently confirmed her diagnosis.

Her vet put her on Enalapril 5mg and gave her Hills KD canned for the diet.

I know there is a lot of controversy about a low protein diet for kidney issues. I don't agree with it and believe the problems come from the cooked foods. But everyone seems to look to their vet for nutritional information when I also know that most of them have had little to know nutritional training. Holistic vets are the exception.

From my research I told her the best diet would be a high quality raw food diet. This I believe would put the less stress on the kidneys.


Her not wanting to do raw yet led me to a recipe that I found in a reference book at our store from Dr. Pitcairn's New Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats. The kidney recipe he recommends is hamburger, rice, eggs, carrots, a little garlic, b complex, C, safflower oil, salt and calcium.
This upped her protien to 17% and fat to 25%.

She stopped eating the KD food and when I introduced this food, she ate it great. After a couple days she's not so interested. My mom has to add something, NV's Boost, baby food, cottage cheese or something to get her to eat it now.


She doesn't know what's best and needs a little more guidance as for diet and/or any supplements.
We are asking for any recommended diets, supplements, or suggestions as to what we need to do for her long term.

She is open to a raw food diet if you suggest this to be the best thing for her.

We do carry several raw foods for dogs, one is about 95% protein and 5% veggies and the other is 80% with 20% veggies. Both have bone and organ meat ground up in them.

We are also looking for what variety of proteins she might have so to keep her interested in eating.

Her dog is a 14 y/o dachshund who has been healthy most of her life. A few teeth issues.
She has a few fatty lumpy tumors that the vet is just leaving alone. Her weight is good and her activity is good.

My wife and I own a natural pet food store so she has been eating only premium pet foods and some homemade. We haven't been able to convert her to a raw food diet as of yet.

She mostly gets grain free canned food, a little homemade that consist of ground turkey, oatmeal and some veggies. She gets a few grain free kibble bits on top.

She gets enzymes and probiotics on every meal, a fish pill and some greens.

I have no photo's of her with me but she is a standard looking black and tan dachshund.

Thank you for your help.

Comments for Best Dog Food Diet For Kidney Issues

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Feb 16, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Best Dog Food Diet for Kidney Issues
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Roger,

Yes, there is a lot of controversy regarding low protein diets for kidney disease. Probably due to the fact that *cooked* proteins seem to be more difficult for the kidneys to handle, but RAW proteins are easier. So, I agree with you that a RAW diet would be best for your mom's little Dachsund.

Dr. Pitcairn's diet recipe for kidney disease is excellent. But I believe that he recommends the meat to be RAW and the vegetables to be cooked. So, I am not sure if your mother was cooking the hamburger???

For now, if she is feeding canned food plus turkey and vegetables, perhaps she would consider NOT cooking the turkey, (or cook it only *rare*), substitute cooked potato or yams for the oatmeal, and cook the vegetables, and see if that helps her appetite. From past experience, I can tell you that small breed dogs DO NOT care for raw diets, (unfortunately), perhaps they have been bred further away from their wolf ancestors than the big breeds?

Here's what I would suggest for kidney support:

1. Renafood by Standard Process available on amazon.com. Give her 1/2 tablet crushed into the food (or by mouth) two times daily, for kidney support.

2. She ALSO needs to start on Azodyl available on amazon.com. Open and add one capsule into her food two times daily. Azodyl, formerly called 'Ki-Bow', is made of nitrogen absorbing bacteria. They go in to the intestine and help to absorb the nitrogen excess causing the increase in the blood BUN levels. (Blood Urea Nitrogen)

3. If the BUN is at 50 or less, and Creatinine levels are not above 4, the above support should be adequate, and I would not give her the Enalapril. She might benefit from one or two injections one time per week of B-vitamin complex .2cc plus .3 cc of B12 sub-Q. This will help boost her appetite.

If her blood levels are higher than this, she may need to have Sub-Q fluids 100 cc every other day or two times per week to help as a 'dialysis' to flush her kidneys.

This is not holistic, but she may also need to be on some antibiotics to help the teeth issues, since the bacteria in the mouth, and dental disease may also be causing her poor appetite.

TO BE CONTINUED IN PART TWO

Feb 16, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Best Dog Food Diet for Kidney Issues
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Roger,

Here is the rest of my response.

Seek the help of a holistic veterinarian, so you can consider homeopathic remedies to improve her *Vital Force*. This not only helps her kidneys, but improves her overall health, which is the goal of HOLISTIC medicine!

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Please keep us posted by coming back to this page and clicking the 'click here to add your own comments' link below.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman


DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Feb 27, 2013
Follow Up
by: Anonymous

Thank you Dr. Tillman for your complete response, it is very helpful.

I do want to add a couple things and clarify.

Right now I’m creating the diet for her dachshund. I’m following Dr. Pitcairn’s recipe but I am cooking the meat first. My mom has never fed raw so it’s hard to convert her. He does state in his book that if you can’t feed raw, then give it to them cooked.

I was able to show her your reply and she is now feeding some raw with the mixture. The next batch of food I will create for her will use raw food in the mix.

For now I gave her some Nature’s Variety Instinct raw to add in. It is convenient because it comes in the one ounce medallions and they use high pressure pasteurization on their food. This made it easier to convince my mom to try raw. Now that she is started, the next batch I make up will only include organic raw burger or chicken.

The Instinct is 95% meat and 5% veggies. The dachshund is drinking more water now. I wonder if this is because of the higher protein.

Like I said, the next batch will be at the lower protein rate. I’m also adding in oatmeal and sweet potatoes instead of so much rice.

So far she is eating it up fine. I got in the Renafood and will get in the Azodyl as well.

She goes into the vet on March 7th. Of course they will not support a raw diet so I have to deal with them on that subject.

Until then, I want to find out if I should continue the Instinct as part of her diet or just go ahead and mix up another lower protein mixture with the proper amount of protein for the kidney diet. The excessive water drinking has me a little concerned.

By the way, her teeth are now fine; this was a past issue she was having. Also, her appetite is fine, she was just getting picky.

Thanks again for your help.

Roger

Feb 27, 2013
My Online Vet Response for: Best Dog Food Diet For Kidney Issues
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Roger,
It sounds like you have been making some progress with your mother's dog. Improving the appetite in a dog with kidney disease is a BIG step!

You wrote,
"should I continue the Instinct as part of her diet or......mix up another lower protein mixture with the proper amount of protein for the kidney diet. The excessive water drinking has me a little concerned."

The excessive thirst is also a concern to me too. It may indicate a worsening of the kidney disease, not due to the increase in protein. At this time, I think you should return to a diet with MORE vegetables, 50%, and decrease the protein to 50% or less. (Adding in Oatmeal, Barley, or Quinoa would be good.)

Good to hear your mother will feed the raw diets!!

Keep us posted!

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.

Feb 28, 2013
Vomiting from Renafood or ???
by: Roger

Dr. Tillman,
My mom just called me tonight. Her dachshund just vomited quite a bit. She ate her dinner around 3:30 and it was the first time she added the ½ pill of Renafood in her dinner.
Then around 5:30 she vomited. My mom is very concerned about this and doesn’t know what to do. I know and told her that it is probably having a detox effect on her and she should get used to it soon.
But anything new she adds always scares her and so this was not helpful. But I keep telling her that she really needs this kidney support supplement and we just need to get through this.
So I’m asking to find out if this is a common side effect and what she should do moving forward.
Thank you for the earlier reply back. I will adjust her protein level to under 50% and add more veggies.
Thanks again,
Roger

Mar 01, 2013
My Online Vet Repsonse for: Best Dog Food Diet for Kidney Issues
by: Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

Hi Roger,

Renafood should not cause vomiting. It does not sound like a 'de-tox' effect. I am worried about her symptoms of increased thirst, if that indicates her kidney disease is worsening. Eating a large meal (whether the Renafood is in it or not, will cause vomiting).

Would you be able to give SQ fluids to her? Most veterinarians will dispense bags of Lactated Ringer's solution, or balanced Electrolye fluids with an IV set and needles. The veterinarian can instruct you in how to give the fluids under the skin, in the SQ over the shoulder area.

She may need to have some fluids daily for 5-7 days, to provide a 'dialysis' effect, to flush her kidneys. She should be fed small meals, 3-4 times daily, and the Renafood can continue to be added two times daily. She may also need SQ injections of B-12/B-vitamins also.

And I would advise that you seek the help of a holistic veterinarian to recommend some homeopathic remedies.

Click here to find a holistic veterinarian in your area. Another resource for vets knowledgeable in homeopathy is AVH.org.

Take care,
Dr. Carol Jean Tillman

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DISCLAIMER: The above should never replace the advice of your local veterinarian, as they have the ability to evaluate your dog in person.







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